2
2 Like Show
3
3 Like Show
2
2 Like Show
1
1 Like Show
View more

I grew up in western Washington State, steeped in Pentacostal upbringing, devout in my teens, all-the-more because I was afraid of my budding same-sex attractions. Studied the Bible carefully on my own, was exposed to very different views by virtue of an exchange year to Germany, followed by secular College. Before I was out of college I had tossed it all; it went in stages, because the belief system had been drilled into me and was a big part of my identity; to throw that out all at once was way too scary. I first left the church for mountain of hypocrisy I was seeing and, by my mid-teens, was seeing through

Full Bio

Comments

Trumpty Dumpty - This Week's Headlines How Can We Fix This Nightmare Mess?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 20, 2018:
My fantasy: GOP continues to block on Trumps' behalf. Trump tries to fire Comey but it doesn't matter, now that the Cohen investigation is going on separately. Voters, in disgust, vote in November to put Dems back in charge in both houses. In early 2019 Dems impeach and remove traitorous Trump and his totally guilty sidekick, Pence. Nancy Pelosi, the then-house speaker, succeeds to the Presidency. Welcome Madam President! ?
The Constitution and a Deity?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 19, 2018:
No mention of God?!? I am sure that was merely an oversight by the McCarthy commission on all things American!
I Found This Application For A Girlfriend -Can Be Adapted to Boyfriend
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 19, 2018:
I love how the "No" option for opposition to anal sex is large and boldface. Too funny! But supposedly gay men are sick. Yeah, right.
Does Religion Improve Morality?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 17, 2018:
Interesting to consider that the societies now generally deemed the most caring to live in, the most civil in how they assist the needy and compassionately reform the rule breakers,--The Netherlands and Scandinavian countries...those are for the most part the least religious societies. They are mostly nominally religious at most.
What are you eating?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 17, 2018:
Corn chips and Pace picante sauce, medium. 30 days, huh? I can feel my lips peeling off from all that salt! I will surely dehydrate, too.
Who is it?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 16, 2018:
Sia. But I'm sure I wouldn't have been able to see her face.
Atheism isn’t a culture as any atheist can tell you. Could a culture be developed based on ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 15, 2018:
Re. "Could a culture be developed based on atheism?" I say atheism clears the path of all that pesky religious nonsense that leads to delusion and misery. What could shape an atheist-friendly culture, though, I would call Secular Humanism, which concerns itself with ethics and an aim of solving human emotional and social problems through human focus, strategy and effort, rather than fantasies of prayer.
"Friends with benefits"
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 15, 2018:
I wonder if we have varied conceptions of what "Friends with benefits" means. Is it friends who already know each other, then decide to take a chance on sex for fun and hope it doesn't mess up the friendship? That seems really risky to me. But starting sexual activity early on with a newly met friend doesn't seem nearly as risky, at least in the sense that there is relatively little already invested in that relationship that one stands to lose if it goes sour. Warning: Way too much personal information ahead. Read on at your own risk. lol I'm gay. I came out pretty late in life. I've had exactly two boyfriends to this point. Not sure that being gay automatically makes the dynamics fundamentally different from straight couples, but I do believe the cultural expectations are different. Gay men are significantly more likely to have sex early on in the acquaintanceship. My first boyfriend experience came following the end of my 25 year, monogamous marriage. I was thinking, "Oh I'm not at all promiscuous, and I want to know the other guy well before jumping into physical stuff." So we beat around the bush, both of us, for a few months before our intentions were finally clarified. Even though we tried to talk to get to know each other, in hindsight we were both in a diplomacy mode of trying to make a good impression that we still didn't get to know important things about the other until after the physical relationship started. It was a few months after things got physical that I came to realize we were quite mismatched in spirituality and politics and socio-economic attitude. I began to feel more and more irritated by what he stood for==low taxes, sheltering his property wealth at the expense of social justice. He was also insecure and yet judgmental of other people a lot, and constantly "confessing" to his long-time priest, who kept telling him he could be gay but HAD to be celibate to be "right with God." As you can imagine, that didn't sit well with this heathen, and I couldn't understand why he didn't throw that religious condemnation shit out the window. While I was seeing increasingly that we were not a good match, he was busy imagining the rest our lives together, secretly house shopping "for us," and dreaming of all that holy matrimony stuff that I had already had 25 years of. What marriage taught me was that there is always compromise. Sure, sometimes it's well worth it, --and it sure helps to be compatible sexual orientations-- but the compromise is generally still significant. I don't want that at this point in my life. I want to hang on to more of that independence that I only recently found again. A "casual" relationship can be a great fit for that, if with someone looking for similar things. I am now with ...
To those who have left religious or ideological communities or social structure, have you maintained...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 15, 2018:
I have a few freinds who happen to be religious, but not preachy. As for ties to MY church, that was over 30 years ago, and I moved across the country, nearly 3,000 miles. So I didn't torch those connections, but they just weren't that special to keep intact.
Best album ever? For me it's Little Earthquakes by Tori Amos. What's yours?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 15, 2018:
Little Earthquakes is definitely my favorite Tori album, and I have (I think) all of them. My favorite varies with my musical moods. When I am feeling classical, it might be Rachmanninov's Variations on a theme of Paganini, don't ask me which specific performer. Classic rock, maybe Fleetwood Mac: Rumours. Or Journey: Escape. Or Led Zeppelin II. Funky Pop, Train: California 37. Dance, Ariana Grande: Dangerous Woman. Old Alternative, maybe R.E.M.: Automatic For The People. Soul, anything by Anita Baker. Straight-up pop: Kelly Clarkson: Piece By Piece.
Probably TMI - but I need to talk, and I know you guys won't give me the religion 'feedback' I've ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 15, 2018:
In a civilized nation, there should be professional help available for the disabled. Is your son formally approved for disability? Have you inquired into home aid options? Home medical equipment to help with toiletting? Respite care for you when YOU are hurt and need time to heal?
How Many Atheists Does It Take?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 13, 2018:
Ah, video proof won't stop true believers. They will still believe what they want.
Can America Go Back To Its Roots?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 13, 2018:
The U S's industrial/manufacturing might, along with Britain's military expertise were clearly what won WWII for the allies. I suspect if we were a nation of farmers, we'd be speaking German and paying tribute. Ich meine nicht das Deutsch eine schlechte Sprache ist.
Our Children In Trouble Today?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 13, 2018:
I wonder what the stats would have been in 1900, 1930, etc., if they had accurately measured such things back then--and equivalent plagues we no longer worry about. I suspect it was not markedly better.
Which is Healthier For Us?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 13, 2018:
Which? Potentially either or neither. I am all for legalized pot, btw, but natural is not automatically a panacea. Arsenic is natural, after all, as are deadly mushrooms. And we have lost count of the number of incidents of toxic salmenila or ecoli contaminated organic produce. It keeps happening. I am certainly glad for some modern meds that have changed lives for the better. HIV and Hep C are no longer death sentences, and polio and smallpox eradication also owe their successes to modern pharmaceuticals. (Sorry to be a wet blanket on a funny meme.)
Scary Resemblance of Evil
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 13, 2018:
Hey, Sassygirl! I just bought Madeleine Albright's new (audio)book, Fascism: A Warning, and just listened to the first 3 chapters. She is soooo knowledgeable about this subject, given her life experience. And Oh my Godlessness! Trump isn't a Hitler protege. He is a Mussolini wannabe! His political tactics so far are spot-on reproductions of how Il Duce blustered his way to power. Very scary.
Agnosticism is of the essence of science, whether ancient or modern. It simply means that a man ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 12, 2018:
I really don't know what that last part of that quote is intended to mean. But I certainly agree with the first. I would also point out that there is no contradiction between the terms agnostic and atheist. They speak to slightly different questions, and are both valid. I, myself, actually prefer the label "agnostic atheist." Look it up on Wikipedia. It's a thing.
Religion has always been about saving people or trying to convert others into their way of ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 12, 2018:
I don't know that I have changed anyone's mind. I have never just gone after someone's faith for the sake of trying to shred it. I HAVE done two things. First, when someone expresses a painful struggle with questions like what is God punishing them for? or why is"God's plan" including such horrendous suffering sometimes? I might try to encourage them to think less dogmatically about God's plan or punishment; to recognize, that even within their faith paradigm there can be different ways to interpret situations. But the second thing I do is, if someone aggressively tries to convert me, I tell them exactly why I don't believe their paradigm, and I usually don't hold any punches. That is not proslytizing. That is vigorous self-defense. I can't help it if it also feels good. ;)
Do you have compassion for the believers?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 12, 2018:
I have compassion for humans. We all screw up. Some screw ups are more hurtful than others. In all honesty, when I am personally negatively effected by someone else's selfish, or even intentionally hurtful, behavior, I get angry. But I still don't forget they are human. But let's be clear: empathy does not mean we excuse bad behavior. It just means we don't write off the offender's humanity because of it.
For those natives of LA-MS, have you lived in other places? For those who are not native, why did ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 12, 2018:
Not native. Born and raised around the Puget Sound of Washington State. An exchange student year in Germany in 12th grade led me to want to attend college in a new region of the country, to broaden my horizons about my home country. So I applied several places and Tulane U. Gave my the best financial aid. First set foot in Louisiana to start college in 1986. Left after graduating in 1990 but returned in 1999 when my spouse at the time returned to Tulane for a PhD. Then my child was born here and I got a career going and got invested in the,area. It was not actually my choice as much as family ties. So here I am probably until retirement. Maybe for life if my significant other doesn't want to move. Positives: I love gardening, and the climate is pretty good for that, because of such a long season and minimal freezes. ...And it is nice and green here, even if a bit flat for my taste. I also do like my job. Honestly, I don't like the culture, but happiness is more determined by what one is doing and by personal relationships than by where one is, I believe. I have met some thoughtful people. Negatives: culture, in many ways, Louisiana is so ass-backward. Sorry, but it just is, compared to the Pacific Northwest. Awful schools as a whole, sucky economy, sickening deference to big polluting industries at the expense of the health of the people, I miss the beautiful mountain scenery of back home. And I am surrounded by so much religiously fueled and racist ignorance here, despite it, thankfully, not being absolutely everyone.
I have changed attitudes about many things over the years. It wasn't that long ago when I hated ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 11, 2018:
I love that you posted this! I call it the Ellen Effect, meaning that she is the prime example of how simple exposure to nice people who happen to belong to a given demographic can do wonders for acceptance and respect. I, too, had hang ups about homosexuality, but in my case, it was trickier, because I was gay and couldn't accept it. I was also Republican-leaning and devout Pentacostal, so you can begin to imagine the internal conflict. All those conservative outlooks are totally changed for me.
Scary Resemblance of Evil
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 10, 2018:
The Trump apologists will claim these pictures are meaningless gestures seized on by radical liberals intent on smearing Trump. I only WISH they were mere gestures. The fascist parallels are unfortunately glaring and deeply troubling. --Trump hates the Free Press and is waging a concerted campaign to erode and degrade it. He attacks the judiciary, not respecting the co-equal, governing role of an independent court. --He broadcasts his expectation for public officials to pledge loyalty, NOT to the duties of their office, but to him, personally, like some would-be dictator. --speaking of which, he lauds actual dictators and attacks our allies. --He appeals to the worst, the crudest populist racist appeals to inflate the egos of his base supporters by scape-goating marginalized groups and thereby distract his supporters from actual issues that effect their well-being. --He war-mongers. --And of course, he lies. Oh! How he lies. Every politician spins and selectively omits and occasionally employs wishful-thinking in place of facts, but Trump is on record vomiting an avalanche of falsehoods like no other president before him. Anyone still insisting that he is no less honest than any other politician has either drunk too much Faux News Kool-aid or is smoking crack.
What was your “ah ha” moment when you realized religion was bs?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 10, 2018:
It was more like a few "ah ha" moments. I abandoned faith in stages, between ages of 17 and 20. First and easiest was the church. Just witnessed too much hypocrisy and realized what a thoroughly human institution it is. Second was the Bible as infallible word of God. I was an exchange student at 18 in Germany, and we had religion class in public school. Quite the eye opener for me, to see it was far from being Sunday school. That teacher ripped the Bible to shreds metaphorically, pointing out countless contradictions and factual errors that church had always glossed over. Finally, the idea that God was still up there watching over me, waiting for me to screw up; that was my last notion to go. The fear of being punished if I was wrong had hung over me. Home from college the summer after my sophomore year, dutifully attending church with my parents to placate them, pretty doubtful about it all by then. I was chatting with the pastor's wife, and she asked about school. Then she carefully admonished me to "be careful" going to secular university, "because that secular education can sound so logical, so reasonable, but worm its way to getting between us and a relationship with God." I remember that moment thinking, Lady! If your faith can't stand up to reasoned scrutiny, what good is it? It clicked for me that my doubt of the existence of God was no sin at all, rather it was simply honesty. And any God that is supposed to be both omniscient and all loving would never condemn us to eternal torment simply for that honest doubt. To do so would make God an oxymoron, an impossible contradiction. That was the moment I stopped looking over my shoulder and let go of the final shreds of belief.
I just got a video call from my ex boyfriend who is working on a project for Brookings Institute in ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 8, 2018:
Yes, similar. I coparent with my ex. We have dinner once or twice a week. Just watched a movie tonight as a family, with our teen. She does have things about her that annoy me, and probably she could say the same, but we remain friends. Shoot! She works down the hall from my boyfriend. It is definitely best NOT to be enemies.
What Is really Important?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 6, 2018:
Really? I think it dies with you. Sorry, but true.
As I mentioned in another post, heritage seems to play a ger role in the south than it does in the ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 6, 2018:
I was born and raised in Puget Sound region of western Washington State. I first came to Louisiana to attend Tulane U. In the mid 1980s. Does that make me a carpetbagger? A damn Yankee? My sister is a professional archivist and genealogy hobbyist. Our DNA reveals us to be thoroughly western European stock, which is so disappointing to me (I wanted some surprises from around the globe). Dad's father, mostly German. My great grandfather emigrated from eastern Germany in the late 19th century and became postmaster general for a small Minnesota town. Grandpa was in the merchant marines right after WWI. Grandma was half Swedish, the rest a mix of Scotch and Irish. My mother's family traces back to the Puritan colonial migration to America 300 years ago. She was a mix of English, Irish, and French. She was a Bissell, yes, the same large clan that spawned the vacuum,cleaner empire. Also counts one ambassador and a couple federal judges among her ancestors. But her own parents were simple hardworking folk. Grandpa lost his farm in the Great Depression and went to work for the railroad. But he was retired by the time I was born. Built the family house with his own hands. He had the most amazing fruit and vegetable garden packed into his third of an acre suburban lot. Very fond childhood memories of that garden. As for religious heritage, both my parents were raised in moderate mainline Protestant tradition, ...though Dad's dad was an atheist who never attended church with Grandma and Dad and my uncles. All three boys grew up somehow to embrace fundamentalist evangelical movements. My parents actually met at a revival tour of some sort. ...Pentacostal brand, West Coast. Bat-shit crazy is what it was, but it led to some interesting experiences, such as me being born on a Pacific Northwest Native American reservation, as my parents were doing missionary work. One of my earliest memories was of the rough, unfinished interior of the log cabin church on the reservation. A little later, I accompanied my dad as a 7 and 8 year old to a state penitentiary, an island prison in the Puget Sound, where he led Bible study breakfasts, and I remember sitting in a mess hall surrounded by grown men in Orange coveralls. It is hard for me to imagine that being allowed in today's world.
How do you do on this test?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 5, 2018:
$80
What is your favorite creature of all time?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 5, 2018:
Tough call. I love silly playful creatures--otters and lemurs. But my favorite might be parrots, for their goofy but impressive intelligence, and their love of dancing to any drum beat. They are hysterical.
Which is your favorite RUSH album? (Negative points for anything after Moving Pictures, just ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 5, 2018:
Forgot to mention, Geddy didn't learn to sing properly until later in his career(he seemed to have inhaled a touch of helium/chipmunk juice in those early albums). And Niel has always been great, but he got better and better with age. Alex, hard to tell.
Which is your favorite RUSH album? (Negative points for anything after Moving Pictures, just ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 5, 2018:
Okay, old jerk, ;) 2112 and Moving Pictures are great, but some of my favorite songs are not from those albums. Any good atheist should appreciate first and foremost, Roll the Bones (the song, not the album). Because I Can't find a better overall studio album than Moving Pictures, and because Rush has had incredible longevity, just to earn negative points and because you didn't specify "studio" albums only, I am going to pick 2003's "Rush in Rio," a 3 disco tour concert album that is awesome--especially if you watch the DVD. Second will be Presto (yes, you can accuse it of pandering to commercial demands, but it takes me back to my last months of college, when I saw them on their Presto tour. Honestly, though, I rarely listen to their studio albums anymore, because I made my own compilations.
Carl sagan says
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 4, 2018:
There ya go, PROOF in Jeff Sessions mind that marijuana use leads to evil,things, ...SEE? It turned Carl Satan into an ATHEIST! (Gasp) ...oops, Freudian typo. Sagan, or Satan, take your pick. ;)
Who else is spring cleaning?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 3, 2018:
Valerina, my tip for helping you decide what to toss, is watch some HGTV shows on organizing and/or the tiny house movement. They will inspire you to let go of stuff, ...plus sitting in front of the tv is easier than actually cleaning. ;)
Who else is spring cleaning?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 3, 2018:
Weeeell, I have to move in a few weeks, so I kind of have no choice.
Besides Agnostic.com what other websites do you spend time on?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 3, 2018:
Friendly Atheist on Patheos, various news sites, facebook, youtube, and when the mood strikes, shopping sites. Oh, and quite a while ago, I frequented the rose forum on gardenweb.com. now that I have just bought my first house, (Yay!) I think I may be back to gardenweb soon.
Should We List All Companies that Pander to the Religious?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 2, 2018:
Boycotts seem to backfire. THREATS of boycott are sometimes effective. It's great to air our concerns about a company's practices or dubious affiliations, and even to say that is why we personally won't be doing business with them. But when it comes to these unfair perks for church-goers, I think there are far too many of them to want to join us to teach thst company a lesson. Boycotts often end up becoming publicity and HELPING business. I am thinking of Chik Filet and the anti-abortion activism of the owner. Attempted boycotts spurred counter-action by abortion opponents, who flocked to the restaurant in droves. Or the million mom's who boycotted JC Penney over their use of Ellen DeGeneres as an ad spokeswoman. That certainly backfired at the time.
Easter haIrdo to the extreme
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Apr 2, 2018:
I like It!
Walking to work I'm approached by an woman with a pamphlet. She tries to hand it to me and states ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 31, 2018:
I fantasize about saying all kinds of deliciously horrifying atheist things to proslytizers like that, but in the spur of the moment I generally just politely deflect. I'm too nice. :(
Favorite snack foods?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 31, 2018:
My favorites are not exactly the same as what I choose the most. I would be fat and clogging my arteries if I ate my favorites as much as I want. Those are...doughnuts, French fries, and ice cream. Since I want to stay alive and keep my "girlish" figure, lol, I eat this very sparingly. My go-to snacks change up some, but popcorn, apples, certain cold breakfast cereals, broccoli, and bean dip on corn chips are some.
What is it do you think that makes you resistant to organized religions! Is it the structure? Is it ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 31, 2018:
I don't participate in, or subscribe to religion, because I came to realize it is simply not dealing with reality. But to your question more directly, I RESIST it because it seeks to control me, it is highly dangerous and destructive to causes I value (i.e. the environment, respect for, and nurturance of science and fact-based learning, dignity for LGBT people, true respect for diverse demographic groups, and healthy appreciation for sexuality), it condemns people unjustly, and it is wielded like a weapon of social control by power-hungry, fundamentally dishonest people who, paradoxically, claim moral high ground and honesty but are anything but moral or honest. If I believed in evil as a tangible force, I would say religion is its number one weapon.
What would your last wIsh be?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 30, 2018:
"What" depends partly on what my physical condition would allow. I would love a tour of Italy.
Remember how a bIll becomes law?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 30, 2018:
Queue the song from Cabaret!
Man's Best Friend
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 30, 2018:
That sounds like a Weimeraner. :)
What liars and hypocrites fear most is the truth.
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 30, 2018:
Ever notice how the biggest, most committed liars seem to be the quickest to accuse others of lying? I am directly thinking of our nation's current president. Literally everything he accuses other public figures of doing, we eventually find out he has been grotesquely guilty of, himself. What a surprise (not so much.) ALL politicians play loosely with truth. It gets very "bendy" in their hands. A 2016 independent analysis figured that the MOST honest of Presidents and those running for that office were only completely telling the truth about 62% of the time. But Donald Trump was in a class of compulsive liar rarely ever even seen before. The only other politician to come close to his level of sheer dishonesty, according to the survey, was Ted Cruze. Good job, America! You elected a severe malignant narcissist and pathological liar to be "leader of the free world."
I watched an interesting 3 hour doc. on YouTube called " An Humbling Journey: Abandoning Religion, ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 29, 2018:
Thanks! I will definitely check that out.
When aging is unavoidable, why is ageism a thing? I guess, I didn't start to think I was getting ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 29, 2018:
Good topic! I guess there are several different arenas in which ageism rears its head. But specifically about the work world, I see it all the time with people I counsel, so many forced out of their jobs or made miserable intentially to try to get them to retire on their own. NPR had a segment just last day talking to IBM programmers, and the company's recent shift in culture no longer showing any consideration for senior employees. It reported they absolutely directly force retirement now at age 55. I am 50, and even as a professional I realize finding another job at my age starts to get difficult. That is a major reason that, no matter how much I might rather live in a different state, I plan to stay where I am at and retire from my present company, then consider relocating only after I have retired.
Heart breaker..
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 28, 2018:
He fell hard for me. I had little experience and was taken in by the fact someone actually desired Me. A few months in and I realized we were both in love with the idea of being in love rather than in love with the actual person the other was. He still didn't realize that, though I tried to explain it. I ended it. He wanted to be friends, but was actually hoping I'd come back to the relationship. So even talking is a little perilous. I wish him well, but....he was/is a devout Roman Catholic and Trump,voter who cares more for low property taxes than civil rights or helping the poor (Still hard for me to wrap my head around how any self-respecting gay man could be those other things). If you have read any of my posts on this site, you instantly see what a mismatch that is....Need I say more.
Living in the south
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 26, 2018:
I am from the Pacific Northwest, Seattle area, fairly progressive. I have been living in either Alabama or Louisiana since 1991, so quite a while. The ONLY way for me to survive it emotionally is to seek out like-minded people. Hanging around academic professional types helps. I attended a Unitarian Unitarian "church" for a few years, which really is not a church in the traditional sense, because they have no actual doctrine that adherents are expected to profess faith in; only suggested principles, and they teach respect for diversity. Currently I am part of a small Freethinkers meet up group in Baton Rouge that meets a couple times a month. Oh, and I am dating someone I met on a dating site, where I prominently featured my non-religious and political persuasions. It took months and months but we finally found each other. ?
Let's Make America Great Again
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 25, 2018:
Nice. But regarding the second comic, they crucified Kathy Griffin in the press for expressing an essentially similar sentiment.
Religion vs. Science from Seth McFarland
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 25, 2018:
I love Seth! Straightforward. Simple.
What defines a good person to you?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 24, 2018:
Empathy, thoughtfulness, and integrity (honesty plus trustworthiness).
God hates porn?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 24, 2018:
This hypothetical God hypothetically made sex AND sex drive. "He" programmed most men to be easily stimulated by visual imagery. I wonder why "he" set men up to sin like that. Hmm...
MCMASTER OUT- JOHN BOLTON IN NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER What should we expect for North Korea ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 24, 2018:
Disastrous all around. My desperate need for consolation has me thinking that, just maybe, Trump thinks he can scare Kim by appointing this war monger who openly advocates preemptive war; that Trump has said he likes to hear his cabinet argue, but that HE decides policy. But he is so impulsive and reckless that even the idea that Bolton is meant as a tough-guy bluff gives me little comfort.
Trumpty dumpty-last man on the planet?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 22, 2018:
Money Money Money Famous Money Money Money Conman Money Money Money
Book Recommendations ??
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 20, 2018:
"A Manual For Creating Atheists," by Peter Boghosian. It is excellent. Promotes an approach called street epistemology to break through religionists' delusion that their learned faith system is infallible. People need to understand that their sincere conviction does not guarantee they are right. Only then can they really hear evidence presented to them that contradicts their precious tenets of faith.
Dog owners In the whIte house
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 18, 2018:
I imagine him as a teenager honing his "skill" of firing people by starting with dogs. So he's gotten rid of any that could stand him. Oh wait! That's it. Dogs are sharply perceptive of mood and, by inference, character. Trump probably sets off all kinds of warning for them. That could be Why he can't be around them. They go to barking, because he is toxic to be around.
Dog owners In the whIte house
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 18, 2018:
I imagine him as a teenager honing his "skill" of firing people by starting with dogs. So he's gotten rid of any that could stand him. Oh wait! That's it. Dogs are sharply perceptive of mood and, by inference, character. Trump probably sets off all kinds of warning for them. That could be Why he can't be around them. Theu go to barking, because ghrŕ6
TraffIc dIlemma
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 17, 2018:
lol
Perseverance
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 17, 2018:
My least healthy would be vegging in front of the tv for hours, effectively avoiding tackling my to-do list. My healthiest is, of course, spending hours on Agnostic.com sounding out ideas here and digesting valuable wisdom from all of you here! (How's that for totally sucking up?) ;)
Trust
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 17, 2018:
All trust is NOT equal. I absolutely agree with the comment that trust is earned, not automatic. But there is also the important distinction to be made between... ( trusting someone's intentions and goodwill vs. trusting that their judgment and knowledge are infallible.) For the former, many people have quickly and easily gained my trust. For the latter, no one, including myself can do that perfectly. Also, trust is an action rather than merely a feeling. Trusting involves taking some risk. We have to take some degree of risk to even give the other person the chance to earn our trust. If we can't trust at all, we shut people out, and the result, sadly, is that we remain alone. If we are healthy about it, not foolish, we will risk trusting in situations that, if we are disappointed, we can accept the disappointment without feeling devastated. As the other person rewards us for placing that trust in them, it affords us more reason for confidence to extend even more trust as opportunity arises. Not risk-taking for the sake of being risky; that would be foolish; but risk that reasonably promises something positive to be gained
A Friend Just Shared This Posts on Guns
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 14, 2018:
Brilliant! ...as Ron Weasley would say.
It's snowing again. Had a foot on the ground and now we're getting another foot plus. Anyone else ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 14, 2018:
Not here, but I did just cut my first garden roses of the season. Does that help you feel any better? ;)
I became an ordained minister today. What a scam. I can legally marry people but they want you to ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 13, 2018:
Late Night host Stephen Colbert got officially ordained and talked about it on tv to show what a scam it is. Even did the most hillarious skit with Rachel Dratch of snl fame. I am sure it is on you tube.
I became an ordained minister today. What a scam. I can legally marry people but they want you to ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 13, 2018:
Not me, but my similarly secular brother got mailorder-ordained when he was just 12. He thought it was the funniest thing to show just how little is needed for this title "Reverend" that so many gullible people place their trust in, believing it represents wisdom and sound guidance. Ha!
Silly humans..
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 11, 2018:
Lololololololol!! Perfect observation. It reminds me of the pickup truck I saw with two bumper stickers. One said "Jesus Loves You." The other was an NRA sticker. That's right, folks, that Heavenly role model Christians are supposed to emulate may love you, turn the other cheek to insult, and tells us to love our enemies, but ..."I will blow your you effing head off if you threaten me or mine." Makes so much sense.
Has anyone read Stephen R. Donaldson? He is my favorite author and I think I’ve read everything ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 10, 2018:
I read the Thomas Covenant Chronicals and the follow up trio. Just saw last week that there is a whole new follow up "next generation" series. I bought the first of those last week. Not sure when I will get to it, but I have some Dune series additions to get through, first. &#128521
Why is it so difficult to connect?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 10, 2018:
Vipyr82, you seem depressed. I am sorry. That certainly does not help you feel you can connect. I wonder what you consider qualifies as connection. Rest assured, connection is inherently subjective, involves at least two separate people's subjective perception of connection, and if you are depressed, it is difficult to feel that any one else can relate to what you are going through. I meet people with some frequency who are surrounded by people in their lives to care for them, and yet those individuals can feel lonely. It is to some significant extent the depressed, lonely person's own perceptions that keep them from experiencing a feeling of connection. As for behavioral factors, there is a classic bit of advice that goes "Be the kind of friend that you want to attract."
Best damn concert you've ever been to? Mine: Depeche Mode - San Antonio, Texas 2005 Also, Ween ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 10, 2018:
Hard question. For me, probably my best damn concert was Robert Plant outdoors, Oak Mountain Amphatheater, Birminham AL sometime in the 1990s, I forget the exact year. There is something deliciously pagan about him. Lol My best "holy" concert perhaps the Yes "Union" tour, in Seattle. Jon Anderson is fairly Jesussy, after all. :P
Is it not possible to search earlier posts? Do we have to begin a new thread every time a subject ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 10, 2018:
Consider that a big part of the point of this site is to stimulate discussion. Searching old posts is fine, but for me, if they are quite old, I feel like I have missed the discussion. I can see why most seem inclined to just start anew.
Christian Family Values: Anti marriage equality, Pro-forced child marriage!
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 7, 2018:
Just to pile on to the absurd hypocrisy of the religionists' morality claims...really, this one doesn't even deserve its own separate post, so here it is. https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2018/03/oklahoma-senate-chaplain-school-shootings-gods-punishment-marriage-equality/?utm_source=LGBTQ+Nation+Subscribers=1205770bba-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_03_05=email=0_c4eab596bd-1205770bba-429666657
and It's only wednesday...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 7, 2018:
See why none of this administration's scandals get anywhere near the scrutiny they deserve? Who can focus in this deluge of shameful news? Remember, during Trump's campaign, practically all we ever heard about Hillary Clinton was her use of a private email server and her supposedly total personal responsibility for the Benghazi embassy tragedy, and that endless drumbeat of criticism over just that was enough for many voters to shun her. But Trump? Not only are his actions a thousand times worse (at least), but turns out he or some of his closest members of his administration also did exactly what Clinton did (as well as much worse). Somehow, the complaints against him get no traction. I suspect the sheer volume of scandal short circuits the public's ability to care that much about any one thing. Appalling.
I find it ironic that Christians, while advocating the need for humility and self-effacement, often ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 7, 2018:
Let's consider the functions of religion. On a societal or group level its about social control. But forget that. On a personal level, religion appeals to the individual's emotional need for comfort and sense of protection, and for guidance. Since everyone sees countless examples of random suffering, death, and cruelty inflicted on innocents, the cheapest way for the theists to feel safer is to convince themselves that all those horrible things can't happen to them. Why wouldn't those things happen? Well, because they are "specially" protected by God. If just anyone and everyone were protected, the suffering and death we see all around could not happen. Since it clearly does happen, the religiously invested have to convince themselves they are somehow different than "the type of" people who suffer. Self-delusion with a purpose. It can be powerfully resistant to logic.
How important is sexual chemistry in a relationship?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 7, 2018:
How much varies with the people, but I think for most of us it is at least fairly important right up front in a relationship but over time other factors increasingly compete with it and may (hopefully) surpass it. Factors like friendship and loyalty and respect. Chemistry alone has led many into miserable relationships where the person comes to realize they are stuck with an attractive but horrible partner. It's Being in Love (Chemistry, hormones) vs. Loving Someone (friendship, loyalty, empathy, respect)
My Philosophy about life is that we should be journey oriented and not goal oriented. For example, a...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 7, 2018:
Yes to journey and process focus! I like to emphasize being achievement focused rather than comptitively focused. Your example of the swimmer with the goal of " being the best in the world" doesn't even require a dramatic loss to be a valid observation. No accidents necessary. That is because even "the best in the world" will not remain so, ever. Just ask any athlete. Ask Tiger Woods. Ask Michael Jordan. Eventually ability declines and is overtaken by someone else. That competitive person's sense of self-worth is then so fragile. Focus on process and achievement allows you to appreciate your own efforts, despite how well others do.
How old was everyone when they discovered Atheism or Agnosticism before they became one?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 7, 2018:
Raised Pentacostal, I worked through the questions for myself over a period of time, from age 18 to 20. By my junior year in college, I realized I was done with religion and its fear-based control tactics.
Describe a (nonsexual) hobby/activity that you love to do, and why you love doing it. For ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 6, 2018:
One of my top three leisure loves is green; I love gardening. It is meditative, teaches me to pay attention to little details, has vicariously taught me much about insects, fungal diseases, and plant biology. I have grown roses since age 10, 40 years ago. Where I live, many of the modern varieties will bloom nearly year-round. And I am not much for competitive showing or flower arranging, but I do like to snap pics of standout blooms...for a permanent record.
Describe a (nonsexual) hobby/activity that you love to do, and why you love doing it. For ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 6, 2018:
I love that you only shoot wildlife with a camera! :) I once had a friendly guy chatting with me about his love of hunting, asked me if I hunted, and when I politely said it wasn't my thing, he immediately responded to my non-hunter status with "not a nature lover, huh?" How does killing things equal loving nature?
What should men or women do to make themselves better human beings?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 6, 2018:
The golden rule still works....with a caveat: also listen to how others want to be treated.
So...I have had schizophrenia for a very long time. While it may not usually be the first thing I ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 6, 2018:
Well, the being a gay atheist part I certainly relate to. If people disapprove, they will erroneously tie any number of issues together, "blaming" anything they see as negative on the other thing they Don't approve of. I am an LCSW psychotherapist, too, and I absolutely see examples of what you mention, judgment from the uninformed.
Does advertising effect your purchases, ? When did you last purchase something because it was ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 5, 2018:
The proud answer that suggests total independence of thought and perogative would be "no." But I can only say advertising doesn't control me, doesn't "make me buy," but it can certainly plant a seed. Some products I would never even know exist if it weren't for advertising.
Psychology
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 5, 2018:
Do I? No. But "should" is a slippery, hard to pin down idea. Many people absolutely will feel embarrassed, regardless that they "shouldn't." Social opinion will pile on. Society seems to view mental health as if it were merely a matter of discipline and self-control, as if all people could avoid mental illness by just making responsible choices. Not so.
Sexual identities and labeling others. I think that it is very important to learn to value others...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 3, 2018:
This is a really complicated subject. Speaking as someone actually with a sociology educational background, I agree that labels are landmines, so to speak. They tend to make sweeping generalizations easier and, thereby, facilitate unfair judgment of individuals. BUT we can't live in society without them anymore than we can go without language. And when you find yourself on the receiving end of discrimination because of a demographic category that you are a part of, it is damn near impossible to identify the issue to other people so that you CAN tackle the problem without some kind labels being applied. We are never going to stop labeling as a behavior. All that will happen is that the labels deemed "acceptible" will keep changing, and people will continue to evolve with regard to which labels offend them and why. I guess that is part of the perils of identity politics and of political correctness. I may be offended by a label you apply to me, and in responding to defend myself, I end up applying a label to you that offends you. We are just going to have to keep calling out when we think a label misses the mark.
What’s one of your guilty pleasures?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 3, 2018:
Foodwise, warm blackberry cobbler with melting vanilla ice cream. 2nd --apple fritter, yeah, I have a sweet tooth. Non-food: home remodeling makeover tv shows; I can just binge watch, and I Don't even own my home. I rent. Lol
What to do about my father?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Mar 1, 2018:
John, I have a similar situation with my soon to be 80 year old Pentacostal father, who is a loving person, though doggedly blind in his faith. My question to you is how your father confronts your atheism. Is it talking to you directly, or behind your back to others he hopes will put pressure on you? What he says and to whom could inform how you choose to respond. My father periodically tells me directly that he worries for my salvation and hopes I will return to Jesus. I have become more blunt with my responses over time, but no approach I have yet tried has seemed to make any difference. Rather than trying to shatter his faith paradigm, I have generally tried to show him that, if God exists as his scriptures describe, as all loving, all knowing and all powerful, then NO such being would ever condemn us to eternal torture for our sincere doubt , which God would know full well was not rebellion, rather the honest result of the limits of our feeble human understandong....as he created us, no less. I point out that the hell narrative of Christians is very murky and vague in scripture and makes absolutely no sense for an omniscient creator that knew from the beginning which of his creations ultimately would believe what. I also remind him that his bible admonishes Christians not to judge and to accept that, whatever he thinks he knows, is still only childish tiny fragments of the whole truth, if even that, so he should not concern himself too greatly with judging my honest perspective, as none of us has the "whole truth" figured out anyway. I remind him to reconsider what his gospels emphasize as central teaching, that is to love one another, practice kindness and humility and forgiveness of transgressions. I suggest that if I am doing that, I am actually fulfilling Jesus' central teaching, even if my honest doubts question the religious aspects of my father's faith paradigm. I have said all that over time, and he does not know how to refute my reasoning, but he still worries I am going to hell. (Sigh)
Temper Temper..
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 28, 2018:
I have never had much temper. Anger, sure. But not explosive, not temper. I like to think of anger as a healthy motivator to confront wrongs, injustices, and heartless insensitivity. But temper threatens to drive the train off a cliff, so to speak, which usually does more harm than good. I find a key to avoiding explosive temper is to learn assertiveness and avoid bottling up feelings just for the sake of conflict avoidance. Those bottles have a way of eventually exploding.
Why do pro-choice women not support a mans right to reproductivity?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 25, 2018:
This is an ugly topic, and I think that's because there is no perfect answer. In an ideal world, no child would ever be born without parents who want it and are prepared to nurture it and guide it, and no parents would feel trapped. But where conflicting agendas and priorities collide, there is no ideal outcome. Women have plenty of vulnerability when it comes to pregnancy and childbirth, both physically/health-wise and economically and perhaps socially as well. Men can find themselves trapped in a situation that they believed they were being responsible about. I know it occasionally happens that a woman involved with a man convinces him that she is totally protected by contraception when she isn't. There are women (I have personally met some) who want to have a child, thinking it will win commitment from a man who otherwise isn't willing. Many a shotgun wedding has happened as far back and anyone can remember. But the legal system has settled on a general consensus called the nexus principle that says the first consideration of the courts will be the well-being of the children involved, not necessarily of either adult. It is hard to argue that the children were to blame for any of the situation happening in the first place. For that reason, I tend to agree which how the courts have set this up, even though it sucks to be trapped in any situation that you never intended and thought you had planned adequately to prevent. I feel worst for the kids in the middle.
Two things a person can say that will make me lose respect for them: “Let’s agree to ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 25, 2018:
We live in a society where we can't even agree any more what the facts are. Add to that the fact that people wrap their sense of personal identity around belief systems such as religion and political affiliation and you end up with a situation in which someone would have to overcome first their doubt in YOUR facts being correct and second their fear of what accepting being wrong would say about them. That's a tall order for many, at least to do all at one time. You expect a lot. Actually, I agree with you that that statement "Let's agree to disagree" is not at all satisfying; rather like them saying they are no longer even going to try to respond to the points you've made. But it is what it is. No every argument or disagreement can be simplified down to one person being wrong and the other right. Sometimes both are wrong; sometimes each has elements that are right but neither is entirely right, and sometimes (OFTEN) the question at hand is a matter of values and priorities and NOT reducible to simply declaring factual "Truth."
I am new here hey how are you all ?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 25, 2018:
Welcome! This is a fun site for critical thinking, listening, expressing ideas, and for just feeling less utterly surrounded by religion.
[lgbtqnation.com] This bill in Georgia is called the "Keep Faith in Adoption Act." I am reminded...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 25, 2018:
Pretty hard to argue that this Isn't religiously based government policy-making action. :(
Do you consider yourself a humanist?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 24, 2018:
You are certainly a humanist. To me, humanism is the belief that humans need to be responsible for solving humanity's problems or challenges. "Need" to be, because of course there are no sky faeries to magically save us. But none of this means you must be blind to the abundance of aggravating selfishness and short-sighted stupidity so much on display around you. Every halfway-observant student of sociology knows humans create endless problems for themselves and each other. Basic conflict theory--ideals are never lived up to. Reality always falls short. As for me, I often lose patience with selfish, mean-spirited actions of individuals and groups and can be angry at the bigotry or callous disregard for fellow human beings, but I generally can still genuinely care about people for their human frailties and emotional vulnerabilities, even many of the mean ones. It helps to remember that I am not perfect, either.
Opinions on being a nudist?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 24, 2018:
I am not but would be fine with it if I happened to be around it. (When in Rome) I do think it can serve to help people get over hangups abput their bodies, and that is good. In an ideal world, it would be a non-issue. We are far from that. I know people who consider anything about the naked body to be just about automatically abusive, predatory, immoral, sexist, etc. My former mother in law, who was sexually abused as a teen and has major emotional challenges from that, saw an article my nudist father had written for a nudist org he was part of at the time. She was so offended, she actually said we should not allow our son--her grandson to be around my father. She equated him with a child sexual predator just for being a naturist. (Sigh)
Dating
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 24, 2018:
Ha! I am starting to wonder if Louisianans are legally banned from agnostic or atheist chat sites and if I am breaking the law, cause I missed the memo. So far, I have seen no one even remotely close to local on this site, let alone another local gay guy.
I’ve been shot in combat. And as a veteran, I’m telling you: allowing teachers to be armed is an...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 23, 2018:
Besides the burden of being expected to handle a high-powered weapon and in crisis NOT accidentally shoot any of their students, there's the danger of how to secure their weapon. Students would certainly know the weapons were somewhere there in the classroom, increasing the odds that occasionally, one would find a way to get their hands on one.
Dating the religious. So I met and found myself attracted to a woman recently. I haven't directly...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 23, 2018:
Religion is what one makes of it. To some, it is literal, life and death, and if you aren't on their "team" belief-wise, they'll try to beat you into conversion or will demonize you. I would naturally avoid those people like the plague. But some people who identify as religious are more metaphorical about it; or at least aren't dogmatic. Personally, I can live with that. There are asshole atheists just as there are Christians. How caring and respectful someone is matters a lot, often more than their grasp of factual science. What I can't live with is someone who refuses to have honest discussions about their beliefs for fear of disagreement. I can't live like that. You can find meaningful and touching reasons to care about someone when they open up and share what motivates them, their fears, hopes, life lessons, etc, and when they listen to you do the same. You don't have to absolutely agree on everything. But if you can't even talk about things of personal importance to you, you are accepting that you will never really know each other on any genuinely deep level. Bleh. What's the point. I had a Roman Catholic boyfriend for a few months. He would talk, but then would steer away from some topics. I eventually pushed, because I wanted to know where we stood with life outlook on a variety of things, and he wanted to maintain neat little role-play of the happy, harmonious couple. We ended up splitting over politics, not religion. He was too conservative. He supportive politicians that were horribly damaging to the lgbt community, showing he ultimately cared more about his property taxes than about social justice. I couldn't stomach that.
America's "Pope" Billy Graham, dead at 99. Here's a little trip down memory lane of just how loving...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 22, 2018:
Worst of all, his son Franklin has all the same ideas but even angrier, more judgmental tone to his fire and brimstone pronouncements. And he is determined to carry on his father's deranged agenda.
I think I’d like to live in a nudist colony.... well if I was younger, and better looking,and it ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 22, 2018:
Yeah, "It's cold" is where I get off the nudism train. gotta be comfortable. Have you considered disposable clothing?
Hello everyone! I have recently joined this group and I'm looking forward to interesting chats and ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 22, 2018:
Welcome aboard!
How do you tell someone, with diplomacy that you don’t want to have a prayer with you? I am an ...
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 22, 2018:
It sure must be tiresome. You are quite apparently a smart guy and already know various options of things to say to "make a point" but obviously none of that stops the next presumptuous Christian from doing it all over again. Ugh. In your place, I might just resort to cutting them off by saying "Stop. Just stop. You are literally the thousandth person to pray (or perhaps "prey") over my amputation. Just how many times do you think I should indulge your hope for a miracle that never comes?" Then just let them chew on that. If they try to lecture you about the importance of faith, you can say faith is just another way to waste emotional energy by refusing to deal with reality. They will probably think you are mean, but they will likely steer clear of you after that. Still, there is no solution for the sheer number of theists who presume they have the right to intrude. ... Have you considered maybe wearing a button that says "prayer-free zone" or something equivalent. ...Or maybe even, ask them to pray anonymously for you, then wait until they see your leg restored to let you know that was their prayer at work. That's to spare you the anticipation anxiety. If they are REALLY the loving Christian they claim, that's the least they can do.
Oldies but Goodies..
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 20, 2018:
My parents? Ugh! Both born in 1938. My mother liked Lawrence Welk and Hee Haw. My father believed recorded music was best used only to provide background mood, and he mostly expresses what musical impulse he has by singing traditional evangelical church hyms, a Capella and with no finesse nor concern for tone. In short, NO. No I don't enjoy listening to that today. Not in the least. I love music, though. As almost an afterthought. My parents had accumulated a couple hundred Columbia Archives lp records of various artists. To this day, their copy of Van Cliburn's romantic era classical piano music remains a sentimental favorite for me, leading me to fall in love with Chopin, Debussy, Rachmanninov and Tchaikovsky and eventually take piano lessons. I also heard early Johnny Matthis, Judy Collins, Jody Miller, Tony Bennett and Barbra Streisand from those albums, which did start me on a path of appreciation for vocalists singing American Standards and big band songs, though I have since found many other favorite vocalists.
Do you think that men have become more feminine recently?
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 20, 2018:
Lancer, you made a blatant negative and sweeping judgment near the start of your post, which is in part, I believe, why you have drawn such extensive criticism on this thread. Read your second paragraph again, where you call feminine males (however you interpret feminine) to be stupid and weak, and not much good in a fight. You went on and on emphasizing the value of being able to fight --in South Africa, even Somalia. Whether you meant it or not, your implication was that that was valuable, and softness, gentleness is not so much. So much bullshit. That is not intelligent, no matter how smart you keep telling all of us you are. What the fuck does it matter to men in the U.S. how lawless and dangerous life is in Somalia? We don't live there. Trying to act as if we were would not only be inappropriate, it would be dysfunctional. Why would your teacher describe men from different countries as being generally different based on location and then turn around and divide a group of boys in one place into three groups? Your whole post has implicitly argued for men striving to be tough guys. You argument is horse shit.
Massive study of Australia's gun laws shows one thing: they work
MikeInBatonRouge comments on Feb 19, 2018:
https://www.brennancenter.org/analysis/how-nra-rewrote-second-amendment Read this linked article above. It's important. Our nation is being eroded by greedy capitalist lobbying power. Nowhere is that more true than in the case of the enormous sway held by the gun manufacturer's and their puppet, the NRA leadership, who don't stand for the interests of the average gun owner so much as for the desire of gun manufacturer's to keep up a flow of gun sales. That is what it is about; NOT personal safety through self-armament. Every frigging time another mass shooting happens, an understandable public outcry is echoed by some government official's modest calls for a start to sensible regulation, and that is all the excuse the gun lobby needs to whip up a hysterical panic among the faithful that "Obama is coming for your guns!!!" It was and still is absurd. The sale of guns spike widely after every mass shooting. Is that because more people "see the light" and realize they need a gun? Hell no! It is the same roughly 30% of the public that just keeps adding to their own arsenals. This is paranoid insanity, people. And the gun manufacturer's are banking on that paranoia to keep them rich. Stop being their fool. Capitalism is all well and good. But it NEEDS steady regulation to keep from degenerating into dog-eat-dog, winner-take-all chaos. The gun lobbyists, big oil, big pharm, and tobacco don't want regulation, and have deep pockets to use to convince the rest of us to let them continue to run everthing. We COULD actually use our brains and stop letting them dupe us.

Photos

3
3 Like Show
2
2 Like Show
1
1 Like Show
Agnostic, Atheist, Humanist, Secularist, Skeptic, Freethinker
Here for community
  • Level7 (48,252pts)
  • Posts101
  • Comments
      Replies
    1,398
    990
  • Followers 20
  • Fans 0
  • Following 3
  • Joined Oct 15th, 2017
  • Last Visit Very recently
MikeInBatonRouge's Groups