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Quotidian kwɒˈtɪdɪən,kwəʊˈtɪdɪən/ adjective: of or occurring every day; daily.
evidentialist comments on Aug 23, 2018:
Quotidian on the qwerty feels quirky.
Remains of hybrid human girl with Neanderthal mother discovered in Siberian cave | The Independent
evidentialist comments on Aug 22, 2018:
This article has more information and less hype. Fascinating find. https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/08/a-neanderthal-and-a-denisovan-had-a-daughter/567967/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0R-4OiQVVpc
Interesting . I just checked my mail and found a , "letter, " saying , "High IQ, what a lie ." and...
evidentialist comments on Aug 22, 2018:
@Cast1es -- Some are not communicative. I have a simple way of taking care of the doubt issue. I simply post this picture. By simply enlarging the right side, they can read the certificate.
I’ve been very involved in my local town hall. At this month’s meeting they started the ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 22, 2018:
"Because others do it..." is not an argument for anything.
Does anyone know how to sell ideas for amusing TV adverts without just having them stolen as soon as...
evidentialist comments on Aug 22, 2018:
@David_Cooper -- You don't. Not unless you happen to be working for an ad agency, and even there, ideas are company property. There's no stealing to it. My dad was a top exec in a couple of ad agencies for a while and I worked at a couple as a copywriter for a time. I don't recall anyone ever coming in off the street with 'ideas'. Companies would come in with basic ideas occasionally, but that was rare. Ad campaigns and the ideas for them are a corporate function done cooperatively between the agency and the company commissioning the agency. Trust me, ideas are not a problem for these outfits. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hG0ZXD89Bq0
I hope this isn't too off-topic. I thought lovers of words would find this amusing, especially ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 22, 2018:
Atkinson addict here. Also a bit attached to Monty Python.
If you could learn one thing that you don't know yet, what would it be?
evidentialist comments on Aug 21, 2018:
There are so many things of which I am ignorant. I don't know what to name.
Have you ever been in a newspaper story?
evidentialist comments on Aug 21, 2018:
Yes. Radio, television, newspaper, and magazines.
Saying Goodbye to Planet Earth
evidentialist comments on Aug 21, 2018:
Well, in spite of the fact that I like Chris and respect his intellect, I have a far different take on the matter. Oh, not the history of this issue because that is well established ( https://history.aip.org/climate/timeline.htm ), but the outlook for the future. After all, when it comes to looking ahead more than 2 or three minutes, it is all conjecture anyway --- and we are dealing with human beings and how they behave under stress. Because of the dynamics involved, there is a smooth spectrum of possibilities stretching from horizon to horizon wherein one may pick whatever "end result" that happens to fit their personality or agenda. The 3 he has chosen certainly are possibilities, but they are not eventualities and they are not fixed points. It is likely we will have some difficult decades ahead because much of what has led us to this point is difficult to change and once changed will take as much as a century to have the desired effect. But take heart, there are many places on the globe where the changes are already beginning --- some of them have progressed quite a bit. Like the proverbial snowball, it will gain mass as it continues down the hill until it is unstoppable. I don't see our species winking out of existence, but it is entirely possible that there will come a great dying. That will be sad on one hand, but a boon for Earth and the remaining people on the other. All is not lost. We are destined to find our way among the stars. Some observations presented here are supremely negative: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFGmXcXKd3s And here is why there is more than ample reason for a positive outlook. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVNc7Uns6Nc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lf4M21chh4I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uStFvcz9Or4
Have you ever thought yourself into a bad mood?
evidentialist comments on Aug 21, 2018:
No, but I do the opposite with ease.
Does anybody else seem to have a strange talent for attracting weirdos like me?
evidentialist comments on Aug 20, 2018:
I didn't know you were a weirdo.
UNCLE SAM BOB -- I have a friend, a fellow union brother, who I have worked with for 15 years at ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 20, 2018:
Creative and funny. Think I could like this guy, Uncle Sam Bob.
Hubris. Excessive pride or self-confidence.
evidentialist comments on Aug 20, 2018:
I'm particularly fond of tahini sauce on my hubris. Sometimes, I'll even put a little hubris in my falafel.
Question for this group: Has anyone submitted pieces to various magazines, journals, websites, etc.?...
evidentialist comments on Aug 20, 2018:
@bleurowz -- Yes. Short pieces are handled differently than novels, but the process is essentially the same. First, anything you decide to market must be carefully evaluated for these things: 1) What is the intended audience? 2) What is the genre? 3) Word count of the body text. Next, a market search needs to be made to find publications/publishers handling works aimed at your audience/genre whose word count requirements include your piece. I suspect the majority of writers would like to be paid for their work, so search those markets that pay. Most publications handling short works pay by the word, hence the importance of word count for the writer --- but do **NOT** pad your writing because it is obvious and will kill your chances of being published. When you have found the markets for which any given work appears to be best suited, read their submission guidelines and follow them to the letter. If you don't, it is likely your work will be rejected because of that alone, though most will give some latitude --- but don't depend on it. Submit your work. Be patient. Wait for the rejection. There will be a lot of rejection. Prepare yourself for it. It is possible to sell your first time out, but highly unlikely. Authors who are audacious enough to accost the publishers with their work must also generate a thick and tough epidermis if they expect to survive. All publishers/publications have their own way of handling submissions and the writer is advised to know what they are. Most are painless. Some are ... complicated. A few are infuriating. The trick is to submit and continue submitting until the piece is sold. Common mistake made by all new writers is trying their material on the lowest paying and non paying markets first in the assumption that being published will be easier and is better than not being published. They think that any publication experience will give them a better shot at the big guys later. It won't. Aim high and work your way down reluctantly.
Specious - superficially plausible, but actually wrong. Not an uncommonly arcane word, but one ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 20, 2018:
The human specious has made a mess out of the revolutionary process.
Should secularism be taught in high school as a part of a civics class or social studies.
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
If they are providing other living philosophies in such classes, then by all means.
Someday I'd like to plot out a massive road trip to visit some of y'all. I'll need a big map, loads...
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
You're bypassing Hobbs, NM, too. That's okay. You wouldn't be missing much.
SOUPÇON supe-son A very small amount, a sample or taster, particularly of a wine, a beverage ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
Always thought that was the cook's call to dinner. "SOUP'S ON..!"
SCINTILLA: scin-til-la. NOUN. A tiny trace or spark of a specified quality or feeling; a tiny bit...
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
Her stepmother and two stepsisters always treated Scintilla badly.
AUGURY: au-gu-ry. NOUN. A sign of what will happen in the future, an omen. "Trump's bellicose ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
I went to the hardware store to get a long reach wood drill. They had tons of them in the Augury section.
PERFECTIONIST -- I have suffered from dyslexia my entire life, a fact I didn't discover till I ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
My favorite son-in-law is a severe dyslexic and diagnosed ADHD as well. He excelled in scientific computer programming and is currently the head guru at his company. Fortunately for me, he lives close by and is able to swing by occasionally to clean up my messes. :P
Antarctica is perhaps the weirdest place I have ever been to because humans are the interlopers, the...
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
Closest I came to the Continent was visual range of Elephant Island. That wouldn't have happened, but the weather forced us to take a more southerly route through to the Pacific side on that passage.
I just watched this documentary. What do you think about the phenomenon of spontaneous human ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
Well, there is this: http://trace.tennessee.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5581=utk_gradthes
At what point is a technologically enhanced human not a human anymore?
evidentialist comments on Aug 19, 2018:
I suggest that, aside from the Theseus paradox, humans are in a continual state of evolution, thus whatever humans become in terms of their makeup and form, they will remain humans. The Theseus idea looks at a single object (Theseus ship) being reworked over time, so it deals with an object. When we talk about humans changing over time we are not considering whether or not a single object having all its parts replaced over time is the same object. We are talking about a class of objects (humans) changing over time. They are two different ideas.
Audiobooks verse Regular Books
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
Each has its place. I would say that audiobooks are good for those on the go because they can listen to them whenever it is possible. I suspect that much is lost in the audio approach, but there may also be something to gain. In any case, it beats not reading at all, doesn't it? I prefer holding a book, smelling its fragrance and caressing its pages. Next on my list is my reader where I can carry several novels wherever I happen to be without all that weight and bulk. Last on my list is the audiobook, but I do listen and have listened to them.
If you could add a zero to the end of any number in your life (bank balance, life expectancy, ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
Add it to my age. Think of all the things there are yet to learn. That alone is enough.
POSTULATE: pos-tu-late. NOUN. To suggest or assume the existence, fact, or truth of something as ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
My proctologist makes his living checking postulates. Postulate cancer is a terrible way to go.
What kind of reptile species scare you?
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
David Icke's Reptilians. Those are scary. I mean, downright frightening. Mainly because they are so hard to recognize as the walk among us. Them. The Lizard Illuminati. The rulers of the global organization. And ... they walk among us. The predator race feeding off the energy of children. Holy crapoly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1w2dMekIJLw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjbTBpc8-dU I mean, folks, we are in trouble. Deep trouble. Aliens. Reptilian aliens. Reptilian controlled Illuminati. Doomed. We're doomed.
SHAKIN' ALL OVER: January of 1994, I was living in North Hollywood working in the entertainment ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
Brings to mind our little rock and roll incident of March, 1964 in Alaska. Shortly after the quake, I went to work as the Public Information Officer and as a Junior Planner for ASHA in Anchorage. It was devastating for several populated areas over a broad region. 'Incredible' hardly does justice to what we had to deal with after a 9.2 megathrust earthquake. It was and still is the largest earthquake recorded in North America and the second largest in the history of the world. Photo 1: Railway in Portage Photo 2: Seward Hwy near Turnagain in Anchorage Photo 3: Fourth Avenue near C Street, Anchorage Photo 4: Damage in Kodiak
I invite everyone to check out my 2 groups: EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY & IN MY OPINION. These ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
Interesting thought with even more interesting potential directions, Sir. I don't know how much I can participate, but I'll be there.
Okay, here's the idea I wish get a team write a graphic novel based on......... Graphic Novel ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
Although this is interesting, it is not Science Fiction. It is just marginally Science Fantasy. That out of the way, what do you propose?
Are there any Jack London fans out there? (please don't say "Oh I loved The call of the wild! ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
"Truly, he made me a better man. Yet he was not strait-laced. And he knew nothing of common Christian morality.... he was a heathen... a gross materialist who believed that when he died he was dead. He believed merely in fair play and square-dealing.... Otoo had my welfare always at heart. He thought ahead for me, weighed my plans and took a greater interest in them than I did myself." One of my favorites of his shorts, though it is somewhat problematic in present parlance.
Vanity publishing or self publishing. What are your thoughts.
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
Vanity publishing and self publishing are the same thing. Whether one pays a company to do all the work of publishing or does the work themselves is immaterial. That said, self publishing is a viable avenue these days and can be lucrative. The fees of going through another company are eliminated and, depending on how much one considers their time is worth, all of that is transferred to the amount one can get through the sale of the book. I have never self published or gone through one of the vanity companies so I get my money in the form of royalty checks issued by the publisher. The amount I see for each sale is less than it would be through vanity press and considerably less than through self publishing where the individual takes care of all the details.
I'm really not a writer, but are people that are interested invited?
evidentialist comments on Aug 18, 2018:
That, Sir, is why readers are included in the name of the group, and yes, you are most welcome. Anyone with an interest in the written word is welcome here. Just join and have fun.
Guacamole for me.
evidentialist comments on Aug 17, 2018:
Cooked carrots.
I discovered a new term today. The term is from the German Language Lexicon. The term refers to the ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 17, 2018:
'Sektlaune' is the one I know, but I suppose there could be others. Another common usage is Champagnelaune. Laune is mood. "Er war in Champagnerlaune." He was is in a champagne mood. German is famous for its gathering of words into a single word. As Mark Twain put it, "Some German words are so long that they have perspective." This is an example of rigidity in language. Where it would be easier and more logical to incorporate a foreign word that already has the intended meaning or to coin one to do the job, they string words together to do that. A good and rather extreme example is the word 'Rechtsschutzversicherungsgesellschaften.' This is a not too common but everyday word that merely means "insurance companies providing legal protection." Now, I realize that it saves a little space on the printed page, but WTF?
How Some Words Get Forgetted - It's Okay To Be Smart [youtube.com] Hope you guys like this, I ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 17, 2018:
The human passion for pattern.
How do you deal with pain?
evidentialist comments on Aug 16, 2018:
I just live with it. Tylenol on rare occasions. Sorry.
Is it OK to be racist against white people?
evidentialist comments on Aug 16, 2018:
Couldn't lodge a vote because there is no such thing as race. There are no such things as white people. Even albinos aren't white. Pale, yes. White, no. We are a species with variants. So, if one variant holds another variant in contempt, a word is needed to describe that. Race is not the word because there is no race. It appears that the problem the 'hater' has with another variant is an internal psychological malfunction so I suppose it would boil down to being a mental illness directed toward a human variant. My head hurts. You figure it out.
When I came out as an atheist to my parents, my dad was okay with me being an atheist because he was...
evidentialist comments on Aug 16, 2018:
I would say the best thing you could do about this is nothing. She is comfortable with how she sees herself. Both of your parents appear to have approached their lives and yours in a reasonable and rational manner, so why meddle when there is nothing but self satisfaction to be gained?
What do you miss from your childhood? (Besides not paying bills) I miss where I grew up, family...
evidentialist comments on Aug 16, 2018:
Being able to disappear from the house into the woods less than 50 yards behind the house where I could be alone, skip rocks across the pond, and sit listening to the old water wheel at our mill house creaking as it turned and turned while doing nothing. I miss scrambling across the beaver dam on the creak that backed up a fair sized lake upstream. I miss getting on my bike and riding for a couple of hours to get to the Silver Falls Park wilderness. Other that that, not much.
Tittle: The dot over i or j.
evidentialist comments on Aug 16, 2018:
Now I went and done thunk that there came from a saying my dear Uncle Billy Bob Roberts used to say with a mite bit o' reverence: "Why, boy, you is worthless as tittles on a boar hawg."
Obstreperous: ob·strep·er·ous /əbˈstrepərəs/ adjective noisy and difficult to control.
evidentialist comments on Aug 16, 2018:
Sounds more like an infection leading to a nasty obstreperous cough.
Oh for Pete's sake, it's a F&$ing CAKE!!! [yahoo.com] I am getting so tired of this. In the ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 16, 2018:
Sticky wicket, folks. On the one hand it is imperative that the rights of freedom be protected. On the other, where should the boundaries be drawn, and by whom? A posh restaurant in New York refuses entry of a fellow not properly dressed according to the management's opinion of what represents proper dress. Is this acceptable? If a sign is posted in front of the establishment declaring that no one will be allowed to enter if not attired a certain way, is there a difference? Should the restaurant be forced to serve people dressed in tattered shorts, ratty T-shirts, and wearing no shoes? Can a kosher butcher shop be required to carry pork? Discrimination is something we all do every day. What are the limits? Who is to determine what those limits are and what qualifications must that person or those people have who decide where the lines are drawn? In other words, the issue is far more complex than merely saying that a baker can or cannot refuse to bake when the customer is a certain type. People are refused service for all sorts of reasons all the time. No shirt? **Out! ** Inadequate credit? You won't get the loan. A person with a gender discrepancy between equipment and feeling? No cake. And on it goes. What is reasonable? What doesn't step on someone's freedom while catering to the other? As is readily apparent, there is no convenient answer that satisfies all. It appears there might not even be a reasonable compromise in most situations. I would like to live in a world with a thoroughly cooperative society, but I don't think that will happen any time soon. In the meantime, we litigate, protest, plead, and complain. Anyone for tea?
I'm playing hooky from work today....let's call it a "mental health" day. Making tortillas, watching...
evidentialist comments on Aug 15, 2018:
Waiting for my homemade tortilla delivery. :P
Okay, so there's this: [angelfire.com] Which led me to this: [youtube.com]
evidentialist comments on Aug 15, 2018:
I read the original essay a couple of months after its release. That's how far behind delivery of subscriptions were to our little farm in the mountains. I was six years old at the time and the piece made a lasting impression on me. Fast forward to 1957 or there abouts. I wrote a little essay based on the same theme. I didn't do it to publish, but ego drove me to improve upon the theme. I think I did what I set out to do. It has been so long since I've seen what I wrote that I don't know if I still have it, but if I do I'll publish it here. I recall it being a hell of a lot of fun.
According to a Gallup poll published Monday, a majority of Democrats no longer hold a positive view ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 14, 2018:
There was a time when our government was in a decent balance between those two extremes and our economy was robust. The interesting thing here, at least to me, is that being at the extreme ends of either is not a particularly good place to be, but of the two extremes, capitalism is the most destructive and divisive. One of the problems has been that some social programs have crossed the line and are tied in to the corporate scheme so much that they cost themselves into uselessness for the populace as the corporations reap more and more profits off of them. As for the political side of both, I don't see much at all negative with Democratic Socialism as long as it is reined in with discipline. The Republican stance at the moment doesn't seem to be well suited to a global economy as it tends to view everything as a competition and has some difficulty operating cooperatively. I think the problem Republicans have with anything leaning even slightly left of the y axis is a holdover from the Cold War and McCarthy era. They don't appear to be able to see how a blending of the two can work.
ONOMATOPOEIA: on-o-mato-poe-ia. NOUN. The naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the...
evidentialist comments on Aug 14, 2018:
And the list is long indeed. The errors authors make with this one are manifold.
Hi all, I have to say I felt immediate relief the moment I logged into this site. It was linked to ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 14, 2018:
@grumancl -- Happy to have you here.
As a non theist, what are your top 3 political issues you would like to see addressed in the ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 14, 2018:
You have to be kidding. 3? Just 3? I can think of a half dozen that should all be equally stressed in the number one slot. Hundreds of others in the next 20 positions.
Are they waiting for an attack?
evidentialist comments on Aug 14, 2018:
No, I don't.
Living life.
evidentialist comments on Aug 14, 2018:
Living life as a statement means to me being free to experiment, to try new things, to experience the diversity that life offers, and to have time to learn whatever it is that moves me. It is a self centered challenge with time limits and I have but one shot at it. So far, so good.
It really sucks when your day job gets in the way of your writing. sigh
evidentialist comments on Aug 13, 2018:
If you learn to live with what is, you won't worry about what could be and you might get some writing done. Works for me.
Out of Context?
evidentialist comments on Aug 13, 2018:
Simply respond with the surrounding text if indeed it does support your position. If it doesn't, it would have been better not to say anything at all.
How do you think you speak on a daily basis? More from a logical side or more for my creative side? ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 13, 2018:
It depends on the circumstances. There are cases where only rational thought and carefully ordered speech will serve, and there are times when the more off the wall, the better it is. Remaining flexible and ready to adapt to the situation is the important thing. The other important things are being able to recognize what is required, having a rational capacity, and being able to let it all hang out when needed.
What is your favorite breakfast cereal?
evidentialist comments on Aug 12, 2018:
Roman Meal I like to cook the cereal, then pour it into a shallow baking pan. Refrigerate, then cut into nice rectangles. Fry the rectangles in butter until crisp on both sides. Serve with apricot, raspberry, or strawberry preserves. I also like making homemade strawberry, raspberry, or boysenberry syrups for my fried cereal. I do the same with corn meal and Cream of Wheat, but I prefer the Roman Meal.
The Burka, should there be criticism of this headwear?
evidentialist comments on Aug 12, 2018:
What should be ridiculed about putting a woman in a bag is the fact that it is a man's invention and the practice is enforced by men. If a vote could be taken among the women of a region where the burqa is worn to comply with regulation and they were able to vote without fear of reprisal should they not wish to be bagged, I think there might be a change in fashion in certain places. If they agreed with the regulation of living in a sack, then bagged they remain. No problem. There are three basic types of "modest" apparel, the hijab, the niqab, and the burqa. Photos are in this order:
Agnostics/atheists do you require evidence for other things in life, too?
evidentialist comments on Aug 12, 2018:
I hold no beliefs other than the mundane navigational things we all use to make it through daily life without cognitive overload. I am an evidentialist when it comes to anything else.
OSMOSIS: os-mo-sis. NOUN. The tendency of a fluid, usually water, to pass through a semipermeable...
evidentialist comments on Aug 12, 2018:
The Pharaoh Osmosis II is believed to have been thoroughly self absorbed.
Have you lived enough of a life to write a book about? and if you have, would you? If you wrote it, ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 12, 2018:
I have been told repeatedly that I should write an autobiography. Will I? Probably not. Why not? I don't really know specifically. I think it is possibly because I'm not interested enough to do it. I have written and published all sorts of stuff from novels to technical treatises, but all of it was driven by an interest and a need to do it for various reasons. A book about my life is not high on my list of things I need to do. That in no way says one should not write their biography. I you feel driven or even slightly motivated to write it, by all means, go ahead and do it.
ESOTERIC: es-o-ter-ic. ADJECTIVE. Intended for or likely to be understood by only a small number ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 12, 2018:
And one who uses esoteric comment as a weapon of choice is an **ESOTERROIST**, a word I invented and used in one of my stories.
Was becoming atheist difficult?
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
One of the easiest things I've ever done.
An Evening with Richard Dawkins & Carolyn Porco
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
Carolyn is such a neat person. Hustle yourself on down there. You won't be sorry.
Where are you when you feel most alive and full of wonder?
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
I don't have any particular place, time, or set of conditions to be awed spitless. It just happens whenever, wherever, and however. It can be ... dangerous.
A question for someone out there with arcane knowledge: were oxen ever used extensively as draft ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
From an article: Oxen were commonplace in British colonies starting in the 1600s. Plantation owners and small farmers relied on them for all sorts of tasks as well as for milk, meat, hides, and fat. During the Revolutionary War, oxen hauled supplies; they were links in the Continental Army's logistical network. In September 1781, Williamsburg citizens saw what was probably the largest assemblage of cattle in the town's history when George Washington's supply column passed through on its way to the Battle of Yorktown. Oxen remained the main beasts of burden until late in the nineteenth century, when horses and mules replaced them. Colonial Williamsburg has used oxen in historic interpretation for more than four decades. Holsteins came first in 1963 for "Life on the Street" programs. Over time, the Holsteins were replaced by two rare breeds. The Coach and Livestock Department has eight oxen—Milking Shorthorns. It has also used Randalls. The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy recognizes the breeds as endangered. By caring for and using these animals in educational programs, Colonial Williamsburg is helping to preserve their bloodlines. The Milking Shorthorns are one of the oldest recognized breeds in the world. They came to the United States, Virginia specifically, in 1783. Their forerunners apparently existed during the 1500s in northeastern England. Milking Shorthorns spread rapidly across the United States. Farmers in the North and Midwest readily accepted them, and the first herd was established on the west side of the Mississippi River in 1839. During the nineteenth century, American farmers admired the animals for their strength, the quality of their meat, and, most important, their milk. But by the early 1980s, Milking Shorthorns were in dire straits. Thanks to a concentrated twenty-year rescue effort, about 10,000 of these red and white cattle now exist worldwide." **Find the article here: * http://www.history.org/foundation/journal/spring08/oxen.cfm
Is empathy the root of human morality ? - - - - - - Empathy and Reciprocity are the roots of ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
Moral behaviors, group accepted norms, are possibly a gift to us from deep time and most likely a product of developing empathy coupled to survival needs. This is evidenced by the general consistency among disparate/isolated groups. The novel I just began assembling research for deals with this subject in a far flung future human colony on a planet slightly larger than Mars orbiting Alpha Centauri B sometime around Earth year 3160.
Vodun (meaning spirit in the Fon and Ewe languages, pronounced [vodṹ] with a nasal high-tone u; ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
And all this time I thought Vodun was a Norse god. Damn. Back to the drawing board.
It needed better editors and fact-checkers.
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
Fact check? What the hell is that?
So this is the only way I can figure out how to het this on here without rewrighting the whole damn ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
There is a story brewing here, yes?
HARBINGER: har-bin-ger. NOUN. A person or thing that announces or signals the approach of ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 11, 2018:
Vaunt-Courier https://agnostic.com/group/thewrittenword/post/152968/prologue-from-my-novel-seeds-of-memory-prologue-on-the-afternoon-of-15-october-2219-the-pre
Can you survive? Say all transportation which brings in food was disabled. Would you know what ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 10, 2018:
Yes, I can survive nicely. Lacking my meds would be the bad part, but I think I might be able to make it through that as well.
PROCRASTINATION: pro-cras-ti-na-tion. NOUN. Do I really need to define this since we all do it?
evidentialist comments on Aug 10, 2018:
@Snickers77 -- I'll comment on this one when I get around to it. Maybe tomorrow. Next week?
Are you Opimistic about the future of the Human Race?
evidentialist comments on Aug 10, 2018:
First, there is no such thing as race. Second, I have great expectations for our species if we can survive ourselves another century and establish a functional colony on Mars. Failing either ensures our species will indeed go extinct. Of course, humans as we know them now will surely disappear along the way as evolution continues.
TREPIDATION: trep-i-da-tion. NOUN. A fearful state, a feeling of fear or agitation about ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 10, 2018:
Fear and trepidation is a redundancy.
Is it just my imagination or does the whole site seem to be becoming a haven for nitwits espousing ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 9, 2018:
@JimG -- No, sir, you'r not imagining it. On the other hand, we represent a microcosm of the human species and any group is bound to have that element to one extent or another. I think we have been fortunate in that they are so few compared to other open sites.
Thank you so much! My lovely purple T-shirt arrived today along with a fabulous agnostic.com pen!...
evidentialist comments on Aug 8, 2018:
Kinda short for a robe, ain't it? Oh, not that I'd be complaining or anything like that. Used to be a big fan of miniskirts too. :P
Lateritious adjective of the color of brick; brick-red. I am a huge fan of your lateritious ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 8, 2018:
Wow and hot damn, there's one I'll be usin' every friggin' day.
Great attitude.
evidentialist comments on Aug 8, 2018:
We write whenever there is time, wherever we happen to be, and on whatever writing material is available.
EXTIRPATION Extinction, amputation or in religion the total ANNIHILATION OF ALL followers of ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 8, 2018:
Heads up, y'all. When y'all start a'feelin' extirpated, it's a good idee to take a good laxative an' if'n it's real bad y'all might consider givin' yerselves a enemy.
TRANSMOGRIFY: trans-mog-ri-fy. VERB. Can mean a humorous transformation or when a person or thing...
evidentialist comments on Aug 8, 2018:
I invented this word with a similar meaning for one of my whimsical tirades: Transmorphilate
I'm sure this will bring the people I'm talking about out of the woodwork but I have to say that I'm...
evidentialist comments on Aug 7, 2018:
The human species is comprised of all types. What would cause one to think that any group of human beings would not tend to reflect the whole to some degree? And it should be noted that intelligence has little or nothing to do with it. There are genuine PhD toting scientists (in the hard sciences) who believe in the Young Earth BS of the fundamentalist Dead-Jew-On-A-Stick crowd. I've had colleagues who consulted their horoscopes daily and made important decisions based on the position of this planet or that star. Intelligent folks, one and all. Although I don't accept woo in any form, I live in the real world of here and now and am aware of how it works. I fuss at them when it seems appropriate, otherwise I just laugh inwardly and move along to something of more interest.
I accidentally blocked somebody. How do I reverse it?
evidentialist comments on Aug 7, 2018:
Who did you accidentally block? It wouldn't have been @Snickers77, would it?
EXCORIATE: ex-co-ri-ate. Verb. To censure or criticize severely. In medicine, it means to damage ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 7, 2018:
Taxidermists are known to do this frequently.
Don’t End a Sentence with a Preposition—Where Did This Myth Come From? I love this kind of ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 7, 2018:
@Jacar -- LOL That old rigidity again. ----------------> Whence came this myth?
What do you call your mother-in-law?
evidentialist comments on Aug 7, 2018:
Dead. When she was still alive, I called her Virginia and Mom. Loved that woman a bundle and a half.
Eggcorn: Aside from being one of my two favorite words, the dictionary definition is "a word or ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 7, 2018:
Would of. Could of. Should of.
I wonder; is it possible to learn what can cause people to fall out of love with a significant ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 6, 2018:
Sure, but it would be on a couple by couple basis. Some elements might be capable of being generalized across a broad sample, but not all. Good luck with this.
@Hankster, I like how you greet every new member.
evidentialist comments on Aug 6, 2018:
@Hankster is a most cordial and amicable fellow, @Annaleda
Okay, Here is the first prompt, make of it what you will 1000 words, inspired by this picture, any ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 6, 2018:
Okay, so I wrote one ( **Mike and Mandy** ) but, damn it, I submitted it. If it gets rejected, I'll post it here. If it gets published, I'll wait until rights revert and post it here. I notice no other stories have been posted yet. Maybe we need to advertise this a bit more to get folks to participate? What say you, @LenHazell53 ?
[women.com] Word quiz.
evidentialist comments on Aug 6, 2018:
Okay, I did the test. 100% - You're A Walking Dictionary! Now what?
MEGALOMANIACAL: meg-a-lo-ma-ni-a-cal. Adjective. A psycho-pathalogical condition characterized by...
evidentialist comments on Aug 6, 2018:
You noticed the subtle signs, didn't you?
This isn't so much a rare word, but the meaning has become rare, having been debased, like so much ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 6, 2018:
I don't share this nostalgia for what words once were. The English language is a dynamic system of communication. That is, it changes over time to reflect the times. It takes in new words and morphs old ones as it attempts to keep up with what is happening in its world. It is interesting to me that we can take pride in artists and writers who bend and occasionally break the rules to produce the new, the fresh, yet we can be so rigid and resistant to change when it comes to our language. It is acceptable that there be some way of maintaining a uniformity for the sake of clarity in meanings and grammatical structure, but that way should always remain flexible so that we can take full advantage of language's ability to grow. So, though the word decimate is no longer used to indicate the killing of one in ten, it should not be mourned. Rather, it should be celebrated that we have outgrown the need for its specific Latin (dead language) roots wherein it was a practice to decimate.
I'm curious to understand: Do you hold grudges? If so, what purpose do grudges serve? Does holding...
evidentialist comments on Aug 6, 2018:
No, I don't. When I was a kid, I'd hold onto anger. I don't know what caused me to think about it, but I convinced myself that doing that was a negative influence in my life. Anger sustained is useless in terms of any value one might imagine it has, and it hurts the self.
PROJECT GUTTENBERG: Use this link to search for books on-line by tittle or author. Great site for ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 5, 2018:
Thanks, @Snickers77 -- I feel guilty not having posted this when I opened the group. Nice to know somebody's got my back. :)
Just a personal note: Got my Agnostics.com t-shirt (and pen) today. Thank you, Admin, and thanks to...
evidentialist comments on Aug 4, 2018:
Wear it in good health. As for the pen, it's not what it appears to be. It's a tracking device so *they* can keep tabs on you. Don't believe me? The first time you go anywhere with that pen, watch for the helicopter.
I've officially reached the halfway point of my novel, and I'm pretty darn proud of myself!
evidentialist comments on Aug 4, 2018:
Oh, wonderful, I get a chance to make you feel really good. Think of it this way: At least 100% of what you have accomplished so far remains to be done. :P
Inspired by a post in another group on this site. Vexillology is the study of the history, ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 3, 2018:
This is vexing.
I'm Larry, I've written a lot. Since I'm a composer of classical music and other types of music that...
evidentialist comments on Aug 3, 2018:
We are always open for a demonstration.
This was posted on fb by a member of my "religious right" family. This is exactly what they ...
evidentialist comments on Aug 2, 2018:
@charlotte62 -- I wish to thank you sincerely for another one of those **WTF** moments.
Adventure Time
evidentialist comments on Aug 2, 2018:
Sailing the Atlantic and Pacific was fairly exciting. Road racing ranks up there, too. Flying bush plane in Alaska was something of a rush. Working a gold claim in Alaska's interior presented several instances of excessive adrenalin. Diving in submersibles like the DSH-1 definitely caused spine tingles occasionally. Flying the unfriendly skies of Southeast Asia was more on the frightening side, but adventurous nonetheless. However, the one adventure I have always wanted and it appears will never be is to set foot on Mars.

Photos

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Conference: Fact vs Fiction -- 2001
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My wife: Julieta
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Granddaughter: Ayrie Pauline Chaboya
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My youngest daughter: Alexandra Rachel Jacobs-Chaboya
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My eldest daughter: Leah Kelly when she was 3 years old in our stilt house at the west end of Galveston Island, TX in 1969
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My eldest daughter, Leah Kelly with me at the studio in 1968. Yes, she actually knew a few chords when she was a little over 2 years old.
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My son, Oscar, when he was playing police officer in 2002. Datsa my boy.
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My grandson, Logan Jay Chaboya and Gramps performing an experiment. We luvs science.
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Me in front of 'the wall' in 2004
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Copied from a newspaper article in which I was featured during Astronomy Day at the UACJ in 1999. I was lecturing on impact mechanics and how to identify meteorites in the field. At the university I also displayed my meager collection of meteorites and related materials.
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Founding members at the signing of the papers of incorporation of the Planetary Society: Carl Sagan (seated to the right), Bruce Murray (seated to the left), and Louis Friedman (standing on the left). The man standing to the right is Harry Ashmore, an advisor, who greatly helped in the founding of the Society. Ashmore was a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and leader in the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and 70s. What a fun group. Never a dull moment.
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Upper left: The four room farmhouse in which I was raised. Top right: Lovely little me on a rarely seen city sidewalk. Lower left: Me and my hotrod. Center: Aunt Lou, little sister, Lou, with me seated behind, and cousin Skipper with our 1927 Oakland Landau Sedan. Lower middle: Uncle Leroy riding my back. Lower right: Me and my tough row to hoe.
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A rather odd tale of first contact with a strange twist.
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The Earth travels in a random shooting gallery and one never knows.
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"Xenogenesis is one of those rare books that manages to catch even the most jaded of sci-fi readers off-guard. Somewhere between the description of cities in stratified levels of wealth and the injection of nano-machines, we realize we are somewhere between the world we inhabit and the world we only dream about, which makes the entire book something beyond a simple novel of escape. This combination of biotechnology and space travel with a hefty dose of hard-boiled detective fiction in the character of Patrick Dalworthy allows Jacobs to create a work that is both fantastic and close to home, one that tackles the subject of what it truly means to be human in a rapidly advancing world and answer it with aplomb." ~ Jamie A. Hughes
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IN THIS INCREDIBLE, SWEEPING SAGA across thousands of years and hundreds of light years we come face to face with our fears and deep prejudices. It is here, in SEEDS OF MEMORY, that we get an idea of what it means to be "HUMAN" and what "HUMAN" really means. It is here, in SEEDS OF MEMORY, that we are confronted with the need to know colliding head-on with reality. Are we, HOMO SAPIENS SAPIENS, truly the only form that humans can take, and is our history the only history? Might there not be others, or others created out of the very stuff of life who are, after all, our brothers and sisters?kith and kin? In this story we find that the lines that divide have indistinct, fuzzy edges, and that we are the ones who make those divisions. Here we discover humanity at its magnificent best, its seething worst, and everything imaginable between, while we make an uncertain attempt to reunite two peoples separated by time and space...and other things.
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The follow-on to Storm Cloud Rising. Maelstrom and the third book have been included into the first book of the trilogy so that it is now a single novel.
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My short story, CLOUD, appears in this anthology.
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My short story, I NEVER SCREAM, is in this anthology.
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My short story, GOD SHIP, can be found here.
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Agnostic, Atheist, Humanist, Secularist, Skeptic, Freethinker
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