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You can adopt any street. What would you name it & where would you put it?
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
The little street that leads in to the closest Baptist church. I'd name the street "Dead End".
Theological scholar explains horrifying reason Trump’s supporters celebrated Armageddon in ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
Oh my. Utterly predictable, but, oh my.
Does The Universe Have Intention?
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
How would it be even remotely possible for the Universe to have intention? I'm aware that there are people who do this, but it boggles my mind that they do.
Do you get angry, annoyed or just plain amused when people think you are the devil for your lack of ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
It does several things to me, but anger is not one of them. The two main emotional responses to it is first amusement, followed by sadness. It really makes me feel badly for them that they can buy in so thoroughly to such nonsense. It brings with it a concern for the future for me. If we can't learn our way out of this, what does the future hold?
How do you communicate a refusal to donate to religious groups? (more inside)
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
Because you were getting ready to offer and they were not asking directly, you needn't have said anything, especially since what you did say was a false statement which I assume was designed more to salve your conscience than to make them feel better.
Hubble discovered using red shift that the further a galaxy is away from us, the faster it is moving...
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
@splittingzero -- you are missing the important ingredient for why dark energy was proposed in the first place. So, dark energy is not a thing -- it is a name for an effect that has been observed. I suggest the following article for an explanation that is both brief and understandable: https://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/what-is-dark-energy
Does anyone know the puzzle of the missing dollar. I've known of this puzzle since I was a ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
The error is in the statement, not in the math. The bell boy should have given each of the men $1.6667, so the rooms actually cost $8.3333333333 ea. However, he returned $1.00 to each of them and that made the rooms cost $9.33333333 ea. Multiply that quantity by 3 and you get a total of $28.00. 28 + 2 = 30. There is no missing dollar.
Help pick a design for our T-shirt!
evidentialist comments on Dec 9, 2017:
I would like to see a design for atheist as well. Many of us are atheists and not agnostic at all.
Hehehe....
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
Go ahead. Have your fun. I know it's turtles all the way down.
Celibacy: How is it working for you?
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
Celibacy? What is that?
Is there intelligent life on other planets?
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
It is possible, but don't make the mistake of equating intelligence with technology capable. The list runs something like this: Microbial life is a realistic certainty with the right conditions. Advance lifeforms is a strong possibility with the right conditions Intelligent, self aware lifeforms are a possibility with the right conditions Intelligence with the capacity to develop technology is probably quite rare Intelligence that has become minimally spacefaring is probably extremely rare Intelligence capable of traveling interstellar, not likely at all at this time We must also allow for the possibility that we might be the only intelligent life in our immediate neighborhood out to a radius of 100 light years. That, to me, would be disappointing -- but it is a possibility. However, take heart because Frank and Sullivan have modified the Drake Equation to take into account current findings: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/543231/astrobiologists-revise-the-chances-of-finding-advanced-et-civilizations/
Would the military disobey Trump if he decides to start a nuclear war on North Korea?
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
I highly doubt that any conflict that may occur will incorporate nuclear weapons in the first place. First, they aren't needed. Conventional weapons would be more than enough to take out all of NK's critical infrastructure and its military command and control within a week. Also, even with conventional weaponry, loss of life in both NK and SK will be devastating. Kim Jong-Un knows this, and so does Donald Trump. Remember, SK has been thumping their chest at least twice a year since the DMZ at the 38th parallel was established. It's their way of saying, "Look at us. We are here. We demand respect." Kim was educated in Europe and he knows very well that he will lose everything with an active conflict -- and he does not want to lose his power and attendant wealth.
Dark Matter and Dark Energy
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
Have you thought there might be a correlation between dark energy and the dearth of antimatter in our Universe?
What's the best/worst present you've ever received?
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
I've never received a 'worst' gift. At least nothing that is noteworthy as being just the most awful thing ever, but I have received a 'best ever' gift. It was a gift that I'm sure changed the course of my life. It was 1947 and my uncle Leroy had just returned from Europe a couple of months before my 7th birthday. For that birthday I got what I had asked for, a Roy Rogers pair of nickel plated six guns with a Roy Rogers holster set and a whole case of caps. I thought that was the best thing ever ... until Leroy brought out a long, beautiful mahogany box that was larger than I was. In that box was a Zeiss-Jena telescope that he had picked up during a shore leave in France. All gleaming brass and bronze. I couldn't speak for a long time and I remember sputtering some nonsense when I found my voice. Up to that moment, I had only read about things like that and never thought I would have one or even have the opportunity to look through one. My birthday is in the middle of November. We lived on a small farm in the hills leading to the western face of the Cascade mountains. There was a couple of feet of snow. It was bone chilling cold. Leroy and I spent most of the night and part of the wee hours of the morning watching as Saturn and Mars rose arm in arm over the mountains. I've been hooked on science ever since.
Please don't stop debating with Christians. I know Dawkins said he wouldn't any more (...is that ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
I wouldn't dream of it, @Hominid ... it is part of life, like breathing, eating, and sleeping. It is interesting to me that as the new crop of believers comes on line, they are easier to deal with. Not because they are new to the faith (which they are), but because they are thinking and understanding more than earlier iterations. There is light at the end of the tunnel and it may not be an oncoming train.
As a non-believer, are you also a Nihilist?
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
Nihilist? No. Atheist? Yes.
Recruiting Tomorrow's Satanists - The Jim Jefferies Show - YouTube
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
Do luvs me a bunch o' Jefferies. Seen his bit on gun control?
How many men in politics are sweating bullets now ???? :)
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
Betcha more than a few.
K, here's a new meme I made tonight... took me a while to finesse the wording, but it gets the point...
evidentialist comments on Dec 8, 2017:
Yep. That's about all there is to it. Nice bit o' work there, @Hominid
It is estimated that 4 percent of the population are sociopaths,and this personality disorder ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
In the latter years of my career, I had a business designing and building custom wooden yachts. I'd estimate that a little over a third of my clients were ranging between borderline to extreme sociopath. A couple of them were actually a bit frightening and I always felt happy when they would leave. The other side of that coin were the dreamers who came in, innocent as the proverbial lamb. They were a lot of fun to have around.
What's your favorite thing about the winter season?
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
My favorite thing about Winter now is knowing that Spring is on its way. Since my thyroid went on the fritz, I can no longer tolerate cold well at all. Before, I was a fanatic skier and bobsled junky. Now, I watch for Spring.
T-Rex snowball fight
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
They were right. I can't believe I've been so wrong all along. Dinosaurs and humans did coexist, and from the look of it right up until recently. I'm going to get myself baptized right away. Damn. So wrong. So long. Evolution IS a lie.
Is Pride A Good Thing?
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
Pride is an intrinsic part of self esteem. My perspective on this is that we should certainly celebrate our accomplishments, our jobs well done, our ideas that seem to work. I think that it only becomes a problem when we don't know when and how to express it, both to ourselves and those around us. We all do, think, and say things we are not proud of, even sometimes bring shame upon ourselves. If we have nothing to help offset that, depression is sure to set in. I tend to beat myself up sometimes when something has not gone right, or has turned out badly, or when I do something I think was shear knuckleheaded dumb. Fortunately, I learned how to keep it at a constructive level rather than beating myself to a pulp -- though there are times when I'm tempted to 'go all the way' with my mental self flagellation. Not good for the health of the self. Oh how good it feels when something goes as planned, or my writing has pleased someone, or I've helped someone solve a problem. That feeling makes life more of a joy and goes a long way in making my last fool's errand less painful. Pride can also be destructive, or at least make one out to be the village's number one asshole. I'm not talking about someone whose narcissism fills him/her with false pride, but someone who is justifiably proud of something and pounds the local populace with something akin to gloating. No matter how true it is, it just makes one sound like a jerk. I guess in the final analysis it actually makes one a bona fide jerk. This is a rather interesting paper: http://ubc-emotionlab.ca/wp-content/files_mf/pridefacets.pdf
I have seen a few post on here about when ya'll walked away from religion. Well here is a poem I ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
Enjoy the boxes.
Anti-Vampire Mob Kills Eight In Malawi, Forces Out U.N.
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
Who ya gonna call? Vampire Busters Disgusting and dumbfounding, but not surprising.
In Life I have learned more from Women than from Men, is that the case for other men?
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
Pretty even distribution for me. I think we have made too big an issue of roles in this world. Mom knew how to hunt down game, skin and dress, and how to cook it. She was good at fishing and could throw a mean curve ball. She knew how to use language that would make a seasoned sailor blush. She knew how to survive with little or nothing, and she knew how to make doilies, darn socks, and throw my ass out the door to make sure I got to school on time. I think we (men) have been the main designers of role differentials and I suspect that was mainly an act of insecurity (gotta be dominant -- hua hua [pounding the chest]). At any rate, my learning has been evenly distributed. It was a woman who opened my eyes when I was struggling with partial differential equations, and it was a man who taught me to sew.
Should we re-think the concept of God as the law originating all laws related to the existences ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
Frankly, I think we should just do away with trying to come up with one justification or another for a god. There is no sense in it and it is not a productive endeavor.
Today something happened in Washington today that I'm concerned about. I support the Me Too ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
We have a conundrum here. Due process is the hallmark of American justice and one of the main principles of due process is the notion of innocent until proven guilty. This goes for anyone accused of anything. We cannot keep Roy Moore from running and we can't evict Al Franken for the same reason. Because these 'offenses' (I'm not doubting the offense, just the possibility) occurred long ago, the usual methods of proving guilt don't apply. How that would work, I don't know. I'm not an attorney. In both cases, we have jumped over the all important middle steps and moved directly to sentencing. That ain't right ... even though I wouldn't give you a plug nickel for Moore and I love Franken, both deserve that due process.
Time's Person of the Year 2017: The Choice
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
I was delighted when I saw this -- and for many reasons. Way cool.
We meet in real life. How do you greet me?
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
None of the above. I wouldn't move into your space on our encounter. I would simply say (assuming the time and place was planned ahead of time), "Hello, silvereyes. Who are you -- really?"
Theory of relativity?
evidentialist comments on Dec 7, 2017:
There is nothing far fetched about it. It is a little counter intuitive until the light comes on, but that's about it. You might find these interesting and enlightening. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTJauaefTZM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2JCoIGyGxc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Txv7V_nY2eg
Corporal Punishment
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
I don't think corporal punishment is a useful tool. To my mind it would only tend to perpetuate violence by justifying its use as a problem solver. Yes, I was spanked as a child -- and much worse -- and it had a negative effect on me until I gained enough understanding to realize that because he was abusive was not a reasonable excuse for me to do the same. That it was his behavior and his problem and I didn't need to own it. I can say that I have never used any form of physical or psychological force with my children -- four of them -- and I am delighted with the people they've turned out to be. I don't agree with all their life decisions over the years, but those are theirs to make. They're all of fine character and successful at the art of living good lives.
What makes you leery about someone?
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
I'm not sure I can pin it down. I meet everyone new with a kind of open trust until something causes the hackles to rise, but I can't say what things do that. I know I'm sensitive to body language, particularly facial expressions and eye movement. I also have a sense of when someone is not being too friendly with the truth, but there are so many different little things that I can't just say it is this or that.
So Trump's done it. Surrounded by Christmas decorations, he's just pissed off a major part of the ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
This from Jim Wright: As the great Michael Caine once said, "“Some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.” Thus: there's this fire. It's been burning for a long time. Nobody remembers how it started, though everybody has their version of it and everybody blames everybody else for the disaster. A hell of a lot of people have lost their lives fighting it. A hell of lot more have lost their lives, their families, their homes, their livelihoods, everything, simply attempting to flee the flames, innocents caught in the path of horror. From time to time this fire gets beaten back, banked into smoldering embers. But it never completely goes out. It's always hot. Always ready to bust into a conflagration without warning. And it does just that, regularly. In the midst of death and destruction, chaos, and burning insanity, there are always those who put themselves in harm's way to save others. The firemen, those who sacrifice themselves for the greater good, who risk their own lives to save others. BUT, just as with the fires currently burning in California, there are also those who thrive on mayhem, on terror, on destruction. No matter how bad things are, these sons of bitches always want to make it worse. In every fire, there are those twisted individuals who want MORE. Who sneak into the hills and set new blazes and then caper gleefully as the inferno roars towards town and people flee in panic. It's almost sexual with these lunatics, these arsonists. They get off on the power, the thrill, the destruction and the ruin. They love the flames. Which brings us to today, when a madman showed up at the fire behind the wheel of a tanker full of gasoline, and drove it straight into the embers, screaming in mirth all the way. Torturing the hell out of this metaphor is, of course, my way of announcing that Donald Trump has just now declared that the US will recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the US Embassy there. We're going to need a hell of a lot more firemen in the coming inferno. ----------------------------- I just realized I should have given Jim's URL in case anyone wants more from him. He has a pretty clear vision of the real world and his blog entries are usually full of insight and inciteful. http://www.stonekettle.com/
Anyone else think the rapture is bullshit?
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
There are a whole lot of people around town here who are waiting impatiently for the Great Rupture -- er -- Rapture. Bollocks, it's all just part of the overall craziness that makes up christianity.
I do not understand this assertion that evolution is dumb. I am consumed with the belief that it is ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
Evolution is a big lie. Part of a Democrat/Progressive conspiracy to keep our little ones from knowing the truth. I know that because most of the folks in my little town are aware of it and they told me. They're all nice, honest christians, so I'm confident that I know too.
If you had to believe in a god,which one would you choose?
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
What would be the cause of me having to choose?
So Trump's done it. Surrounded by Christmas decorations, he's just pissed off a major part of the ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
I lived over there for a while. What was done today shows a total lack of understanding of the problem. However, I can't blame Trump completely for this one, other than that he is more easily manipulated than I had originally thought. I suspect considerable pressure has been applied by Pence and the rest of his gang of over the top born again evangelical nut jobs. They are bent on living out the Book of Revelations -- to the letter. Idiots. My most erudite response to all this is: Oy gewahlt...!
What's the most valuable "life skill" you learned in college? What helped you most in learning ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
Ordered/disciplined thought processes. It has allowed me to take complex problems and see them as simple, discrete pieces along the way to solution. Ordered/disciplined thinking is a part of the analytical process which is peripherally part of the realm of critical thought. ------------------------------------ "Critical thinking of any kind is never universal in any individual; everyone is subject to episodes of undisciplined or irrational thought. Its quality is therefore typically a matter of degree and dependent on, among other things, the quality and depth of experience in a given domain of thinking or with respect to a particular class of questions. No one is a critical thinker through-and-through, but only to such-and-such a degree, with such-and-such insights and blind spots, subject to such-and-such tendencies towards self-delusion. For this reason, the development of critical thinking skills and dispositions is a life-long endeavor." ~ Michael Scriven & Richard Paul, presented at the 8th Annual International Conference on Critical Thinking and Education Reform, Summer 1987.
Are we all racists?
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
No, not all of us.
How superstitious is it that office buildings and cruise ships don't have a 13th floor?
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
How superstitious is it? Utterly.
Who is your favorite intellectual?
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
Considering contemporaries, I'd have to go with Tyson, Krauss, Thorne (not in the public eye), Harris (with some reservation), Chomsky (off and on), and, believe it or don't, Stephen Colbert. There are many others who give me cause to pause.
Is there such a thing as animal ESP? It is a bright, sunny day and I am standing here quietly ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
This is a question easily answered with just a tiny amount of thought. The human brain is a prodigious consumer of energy because of all the things it has to do. Much of it is used in maintaining bodily functions that are otherwise not autonomous. The brain consumes energy at 10 times the rate of the rest of the body per gram of tissue. The average power consumption of a typical adult is 100 Watts and the brain consumes 20% of this, making the power of the brain 20 W. That sounds like a lot, but these figures are for a 24 hour period, so the actual power requirement is minuscule when compared to even a small handheld calculator. What all that energy is used for is important in considering this question. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-does-the-brain-need-s/ The pittance left over from normal function is vanishingly small and with the lack of an efficient antenna it is obvious that it would not be much of a transmitter and an even less functional receiver of EMF. What that means is that for ESP to be possible, it would have to rely on something supernatural -- magic again. In one of my novels I got around the magic problem for close range transmission/reception of thought patterns by introducing nanobots into the human system, but the limitations were substantial because of still quite low power output and incredibly high frequency. ESP falls right in there with the efficacy of prayer and talking snakes.
Do you think the people in this society are slaves to materialism, desiring and possessing more than...
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
Ask the Waltons, Trumps, and others at the upper end about that. Ever wondered why a CEO needs a 50 million dollar bonus? Me? Only those things necessary to do what I do are particularly important. Now, after obtaining a 200 thousand dollar medical debt last year, a 38% reduction in actual income, and a few other little items beyond my control, I can't even consider adding to my list of stuff -- even if I wanted to, which I don't.
Philosophy or Science or Both
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
A healthy dose of both backed by insatiable curiosity and a little intelligence.
Do you have a weakness for a Yuletide tradition?
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
Definitely the eggnog.
What will you wish for if you were given three wishes
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
Wish No. 1: Unlimited wishes. That way I could fix this frickin' place.
I live in a small town in New Mexico was in the post office and they were talking about a billboard ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 6, 2017:
Poor babies are having a tough time swallowing their own medicine.
Aliens?
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
I do wish folks would not use the word 'believe' when what they really mean is 'think'. A belief is an assumed truth, and I certainly don't have that when it comes to the possibility of anything. Now, do I think that life may exist somewhere out there? Yes. I think it is inevitable, given the shear numbers, but there is a caveat. The most likely life is microbial. The least likely life is the technologically capable intelligence. So many random things need to occur over evolutionary time to produce that result that the likelihood is minimal. As sobering as this thought is, it is entirely possible that we are the only one in our neighborhood of the galaxy -- perhaps in the entire galaxy. However, with that thought in mind, it makes it all the more important for us to survive, to move out into the galaxy to help ensure we are not wiped out by an errant rock.
Do you believe in love.
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
Love is a many faceted idea with different meanings to each of us. Oh, we may share some portions of our idea of love with others, but I don't think you'll find a consensus. That being said, remember that we are biological organisms and the biggest difference between human beings and most of the other biological entities on this planet is that we have reached a point where our brains are capable of carrying on abstract thought processes -- we call that mind and mind is who we are. Mind is affected by everything that happens in our bodies, by external experiences, by our environment, and much more. We are social animals and that means we have a built in capacity to empathize with others, to form bonds with others. The key word is 'animal'. This thing we call love is generated by chemicals/hormones, our natural desire to be with others of our species, those hardwired tendencies that we call instincts. What does it all mean? Well, if one bases their entire understanding of love on how it feels when those hormones are rushing along, being pushed by the instinct to procreate -- to preserve the species -- then it is a coin toss whether a lasting relationship will come of it. I think, and this is entirely personal, that to form a lasting relationship there needs to be a bond (friendship) associated with it from the beginning. Just my two cents.
For atheists - what makes you believe no deity exists?
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
I have a feeling the question would be better if reworded a bit. You see, nothing makes me not believe in anything. It came about as a process of weighing the information available and looking at the evidence. There was no evidence to be found, and the information was nil as well. However, I am not one to make an absolute statement because that places the burden of proof on me. I remain 99.999...9% sure there is no supernatural being of any kind. So let's say I am essentially convinced there is no deity, but am unwilling to make the assertion on the grounds of it not being a rational position to take, just as it is irrational to claim there is one.
Watch an astrophysicist explain what happened when he secretly infiltrated the Flat Earth Society
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
Here is a paper from the British Psychological Society that is important to the understanding of Flat Earthers, superstitions, conspiracy theories, and religions. Worth the read. https://digest.bps.org.uk/2017/10/17/believers-in-conspiracy-theories-and-the-paranormal-are-more-likely-to-see-illusory-patterns/
What Is Your Favorite X-mas Song?
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
In keeping with the blasphemy of the season, I offer up this little medley: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6hpJzK5vUo
Perhaps THE most important question I've asked so far.....
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
Wow, Kreig, I don't think I've ever heard it. Hum a few bars for me.
Watch an astrophysicist explain what happened when he secretly infiltrated the Flat Earth Society
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
I had been thoroughly convinced that these people couldn't actually believe this stuff and that the whole business was just a show, until ... until I ran into one at a conference during Astronomy Week 1985. I was presenting a series of talks on meteors, meteorites, and impact mechanics as well as running a meteorite display. I was approached by a fellow whom I guessed was in his late thirties to early forties. He was a ... Flat Earther. He was serious. He wanted to regale me with his 'proofs', and I was completely fascinated with his total lack of embarrassment. I walked him through a series of easier mathematical/physical things anyone can perform to determine that the Earth is curved. I went through some basic pure physical experiments that would show any normal person the fallacy of the flat Earth concept. He would have none of it. I hadn't had even the slightest impact on him and I'm sure he went away thinking I was just another cog in the conspiracy machine. Until we can get people away from the kind of thinking that produces these odd ideas, I don't think there is much that can be done to get the general populace of the world on the track to advancing our society to that next level of the Type I civilization. I hope it happens before we destroy ourselves.
::Art Joke:: Through careful studying of the building plans and months of meticulous planning, he...
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
Ouch....
Dick Pics, ok? yes or no?
evidentialist comments on Dec 5, 2017:
Another flippant remark WARNING: Rigid or limp?
Arizona pastor wants to kill the gays for ‘AIDS free Christmas’
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
These sermons are a few years old. He's done much worse since. Gotta love this guy.
Does it offend you when others talk about cooking meat?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
Doesn't bother me at all when people talk about cooking meat, unless they talk about overcooking it. That's when I get violent.
What’s your view on free will?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
I like it.
I want to know if flat earthers think the milky way galaxy is made of caramel...
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
I had thought that I'd just go out and ask one. Yes, we have a few here. Then I decided against it because I don't like violence.
The Universe. What is it? How large is it. How much larger is the unobservable universe than the ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
The Universe is large enough to reach from one side of it to the other. The end of it is right at the edge of its terminus. Beyond the end is something else or nothing at all. What will become of it all? If the current most accepted theory is true, it will die a slow death as it all cools down and finally goes dormant. The Great Heat Death.
Anyone here live an agrarian existence?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
I was raised on a farm at the base of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Funny, as an engineer, applied physicist, and naval architect for many years, I'm still just a country boy at heart. Farm boy who writes Science Fiction -- go figure.
Should gambling be legal in the U.S.?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
I suggest to you that lives are ruined by a lot of things, gambling being just one of the panoply. Drugs are pretty much illegal across the board and that has not been a solution. Alcohol is openly legal, yet ruins lives in substantial numbers. That's just two -- there are others. Gauging by the results of the last presidential election, gambling was legal there and we lost. Lives are being ruined left and right and a large portion of the country appears to be all right with that. As it stands now, gambling is legal in some areas of the country and people from places where it is illegal just go there to gamble anyway. Why not keep it at home so the states and cities can benefit throughout the country and people don't have to take their lives into their own hands by driving all night from Los Angeles to Las Vegas?
Michael Tellinger - 2017 Sound Resonance Magnetics & Reality
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
Ah, yes, Michael Tellinger of Gaia fame. Another along the lines of the Ancient Aliens clan. Absurd claims coupled to stupid conclusions. Just another charlatan in a long string of bullshit artists. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPBKnij40Kc --------------------- This from Owen Swart: "Tellinger's been around. His only formal qualification is as a pharmacist (the height of that career seems to have been appearing in a Sentrum ad a decade or so ago as the designated pharmacist - even though he wasn't practicing at the time). His CV also includes having been a rapper in the 1980's. Word. But we don't care about that. The interesting parts start in 2005 when he published Slave Species of God. What's He On About? Slave Species is essentially a plagiarism retelling of the ideas of Zecharia Sitchin. The idea goes like this: There is another large planet in our solar system, unknown to science, named Nibiru. It spends most of its time in the outer solar system, but its highly elliptical orbit brings into the inner solar system once every 3600 years or so. When that happens, it has weird gravitational interactions with Earth, causing all manner of catastrophes including, but not limited to, geographic pole shifts. Nibiru is also inhabited by a super-intelligent race of aliens called the Annunaki. From time to time, they've visited Earth and its inhabitants, meddling with, creating and enslaving the local apes - essentially founding the Human race, as well as laying the foundations for all our technology and our entire civilisation. If the terms "Nibiru" and "Annunaki" sound familiar to you, you'll recognise that they are names that arise from Sumerian mythology. Sitchin and Tellinger use a creative silly wrong set of translations of ancient Sumerian texts and symbols to "prove" that just about all ancient mythology should be taken as literal, historical fact - just replace terms like "gods", "angels" and so on with "aliens", and you're all set. Tellinger has taken this notion a step further, applying it to the South African context. In Slave Species and his subsequent two books, he's gone touring around South Africa, looking for interesting and old archaeological sites (as well as uninteresting rocks) and making up stories about how they were built by aliens as landing pads for their spacecrafts or whatever. Why Is He A Crank? Well, because his ideas are demonstrably false, and yet he continues to promote them. Zecharia Sitchin promotes obviously wrong interpretations of Sumerian and Akkadian artwork (mistaking depictions of regular stars for depictions of the planets of our solar system, for instance) and claiming that these, and other, ancient people had knowledge they lacked (as well as lacking knowledge they ...
Mandela Effect & LHC
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
Um ... no. Perhaps we should meet last year about this time and discuss it in depth. ----------------------------------- The LHC can't generate enough energy to do that. Sorry.
If you don't have a photo.....
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
I maintain a 'what you see is what you get' policy, but I must tell you the pics I have on here at the moment were taken before the ILLNESS got me. I now look like an Aushwitz survivor. 6' - 1" and 118 pounds, sporting wrinkles that make a prune look smooth as a baby's butt and not a single tooth to be found in my head. Want a recent shot?
I know it's the Holidays, so most of us indulge in unhealthy but fun foods. But come January, most ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
Hotdogs and Twinkies.
Does anyone know of any research on the correlation between intelligence and depression? The ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
I have no problem with depression and I consider myself quite lucky. There has been and still is considerable study into this idea. So far most of the conclusions drawn here and there remain in debate. Some of that is because of methodology issues and some over selective sampling and suspected bias. Here is a brief, interesting, and informative article. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ending-addiction-good/201503/is-there-link-between-intelligence-and-mental-illness
Buckle your seatbelts, it's that time of year when the Magical Mythical Tour begins again. Do you ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
We build a huge bonfire in an effort to bring back the sun on solstice while roasting christians on a stick. We have a lot of fun.
Who out there makes music ? What kinds ? Play any instruments ? Or sing ? Me : I've sung ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
Biblical comment: In the beginning ... I made my living as a folksinger and songwriter for a few years, but several run ins with rotten agents and a few others ended that. My dad was a fairly successful songwriter, copywriter, and advertising guru in Hollywood, and we worked together a lot. My day job in my early years was as a Technical Illustrator and Writer, so I had plenty of time to pursue the music. I played guitar (six and twelve string), banjo, dulcimer, flute, and tenor sax. I still compose music, but just for the fun of it. I don't play any instruments now (unable to) and I sorely miss making my own music.
Can you prove fairies don't exist?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
Proof is for the sophists of the world -- and geometry. Otherwise, there are no absolutes. Even gravity, though we know how it works and can make incredibly accurate predictions, we don't know what it is. We have a set of theories that work very well, but we can't say emphatically that our theories are the end all of knowledge about gravity. All we can say is that they seem to work adequately well. So, when I say to someone that I want them to show me the evidence, I am not giving them any ground. I am being realistic. I am 99.999...9% sure that there is no supernatural deity out there in the big old dark, but as a scientist I cannot claim to know there is none.
Believe in aliens?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
First, what do you mean by believe? I can tell you a little of what I think on the subject, but I don't believe in aliens. I'll keep this brief. I think it is a reasonable assumption that life exists out there in the big old dark -- somewhere. I suspect that the majority of life in the galaxy (the Universe is to big to discuss) may well be microbial. More advanced lifeforms become problematic. Lifeforms that are intelligent and self aware is even more problematic. Lifeforms that are intelligent, self aware, capable of manipulating their environment, sufficiently endowed with the physiology to produce technology, and who have become space-faring folk represent probably a minute possibility. The fact is, and it is a sobering one, that we may be it -- at least within reachable distances. Do I think we've been visited? It's possible, but highly unlikely. We have no evidence to base any conclusions one way or the other, but the chances are vanishingly slim. There are a lot of reasons for that. Similar to us? In what way? Again, that is unlikely. Perhaps only in symmetry. Otherwise, probably not. Evolution is a random process while natural selection is not. There is no reason at all to believe that evolution on another planet, even a close analog to Earth, will have followed a similar path. I also suspect, because of the distances we're talking about, that the first encounters we have, if we ever have them, will be with alien mechanical probes -- probably along the lines of Von Neumann probes.
Which one are you?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
I have nothing to say. Crap...! There's a first.
Anyone else notice that most born again Christians are former drug addicts?
evidentialist comments on Dec 4, 2017:
Let's put this another way, shall we? I know from experience that many born again evangelicals come from broken lives of one form or another. I also know from the same experience that most of the evangelicals I know do not fit into that category. Childhood indoctrination, yes. Charismatic leader pulled them in, yes. Out of loneliness or lack to a social network, yes. I live in the most religious town of the 18th most religious state in the US, and the majority of the denominations here identify as born again and evangelical, so I have more than enough chance to engage with them. Some of them are indeed struggling ex drug addicts, some are ex alcoholics, but certainly not most. Now, I don't know what your experience is or what size sample you're talking about, so I can't say you are wrong, but I do suggest that you be a bit more careful in choosing your wording so as not to make sweeping generalizations that may not be defensible. My experience in this town is over a period of twenty years and the sample I have to work with is about 30,000 + people. All I can say is that a small number (some) of them match what you describe.
Just came across this opinion piece in the Huffington Post. I am interested in your thoughts about ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Humanist. Well, yes. I should think that most of us are humanist to one degree or another and I don't think it requires a declaration. It would seem to me that for anyone other than the total sociopath, that would be like a default position for almost everyone. I say I'm an atheist/evidentialist/rationalist and I just assume that others understand that I am also humanist in my own way. I think the article puts too much emphasis on the title and not the action. I see someone hurting, I feel their pain. I see someone in need and my first reaction is a desire to help. That is just a part of being the social animal we are -- humanist. Why give it any special recognition? I don't see that it is either necessary or helpful in the descriptive sense.
What is Occam's Razor?Ockham’s Razor
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Occam's razor is the forerunner of the KISS principle. The KISS principle has become the hallmark of good engineering. The problem with this is that no matter how well Occam's razor/KISS has been applied, we still have to deal with Murphy's Law which is inevitable and immutable.
Do you think it is possible to make people alive after they die ? Should we do that, if possible ?
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
It depends on what you mean by dead. Remember, the brain dies last (several minutes between failure of the heart and end of brainwave activity). If you mean after brain death, no.
How long do you keep your cars/vehicles?
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Until the pistons start swapping holes and the rims are tearing up the pavement too much.
Where does relationships with family stand when it comes to religion
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
It depends on the individuals and the circumstances. It's something I play by ear whenever it crops up, which is thankfully not too often. I prefer to avoid conflict if at all possible and keep the importance of family firmly in place. Having said that, it is also true that there are some instances where severing the relationship is the most reasonable approach. I've had to do that twice -- and without regret.
High-Tech Suicide Machine Makes Death a Painless, Peaceful, Optimal Way to Go | Alternet
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Interesting. Cost?
Guilty verdict in 2010 Wilton Manors double murder - Sun Sentinel
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Just a comment about the death penalty. I see the death penalty as state sanctioned murder for one thing and also as a form of revenge. Some people like to call revenge 'closure', but it is the same thing. We also know that the death penalty is not a deterrent to 'capital' crime and in many cases it serves as a reward to the person so sentenced. I would hope that you and others who were close to these two discover some other way to find closure and not to take solace in the death penalty, should it be invoked.
Good artists borrow, great artists steal. Do you agree or disagree? To what degree? Related ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
My take is ... not really. It is indeed true that we all borrow. I had three great mentors in my early days of learning the writer's craft. Elements of all three show in my work in spite of my best efforts to exorcise them. I think the same is much more so for those who did not have personal mentors, but relied on reading, because they would eventually zero in on just a few authors they liked to read and would wind up emulating them later in their own works. If it were not for the shoulders of giants, we would not see over the horizon. Steal is to me the equivalent of to plagiarize, whether it be verbatum or style. One of the reasons I do not care much for fan fiction.
Life's too short... (finish the line).
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Oh goody, another fill in the blank and/or finish the line. Okay, here goes. Life's too short.
Do you like long posts?
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Although I am one who appreciates economy of word and likes to be succinct in my own posts, I am always interested (okay, most of the time) in what others have to say and it doesn't matter much how they have to say it. Long. Short. In between. It's all fine.
This is a bit of a rant-y, vent-y post, which after my wonderful “found a new friend” post ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
No, you can't reboot life -- but you already know that. As for the effect this new tax thing will have on you, the only thing you can realistically do is hope it doesn't pass the next level. A lot of us are going to be affected directly and many others indirectly, and it will all be negative impact. No up side to it. As for your mother's response, I think you did the right thing by holding back, but you may want to consider mentioning it to her later once you've got it all under control. Remember, @evestrat, 'everything happens for a reason'. Sorry, I couldn't help myself. Regarding your father, it would appear to me that you would be doing yourself a favor by considering him a write off. I know that sounds harsh, and I know it ain't easy (been there, done that), but for your own self esteem, some things are best resolved by surgery. And no, I'm not a licensed counselor, but I'm not going to write a disclaimer. About your returning to school to pursue that doctorate, more power to you. My mother went back to school when she was 47, having never done much in the working world and spending a considerable amount of her life and energy as a housewife. She became one of Northrop's cherished employees at the edge of the technological envelope in aerospace. You go girl.
GOP senator says tax cuts must be followed by 'structural changes to Social Security and Medicare'
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Not a surprise. They've been pilfering funds from SSI for a long time, and not just the GOP. This tax fiasco, if it gets through, will be one of the final nails in the coffin of this country in more ways than are readily available to the imagination.
I'd like to hear some sound arguments in favor of universla healthcare and free education. Having a ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
The most obvious supportive arguments for 'free' education and universal healthcare are pretty simple and work well as long as one does not say that they are free, because they are not. 1. A well educated populace is a source of continuing power and as such is a good investment for the future of the nation. This is one that is easy to support as long as you include trades in the mix rather than restricting it to academics. 2. A healthy populace is a source of continuing power and as such is a good investment for the future of the nation. It means less downtime and greater productiveness -- and it is an outward sign of an empathetic government that tends to produce a more satisfied society. Both of these elements are difficult to combat with any rational rebuttal.
Being new to this forum, I've been lead to see myself as a freethinking agnostic atheist. In this...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
1. Agreed 2. Yes to the self-aware life, but I do have satisfactory explanations. 3. It is explained to my satisfaction and because of the explanation it is indeed special. 4. Agreed 5. That I do at every opportunity. 6. Agreed 7. Not what I would declare as the definition of 'happiness', but okay. 8. and 9. We have a general level of agreement here, but with the exception of being tolerant of other's beliefs as long as they are harmless expressions of happiness. The problem here is in what one defines as harmless. Pushing religious ideas into schools, legal systems, and politics is not to be tolerated under any circumstances. But, go on.... 10. Oops. Here be the briar patch, Brer Rabbit. I am vehemently opposed to any male nincompoop sticking his limp noodle into business only women can really understand. Further, there are issues of health for the mother which includes her well-being and only the woman who is directly involved can have the right to decide what that means. Therefor, though I don't much care for the idea of abortion, I also understand the need for freedom to make those decisions being left to the woman involved and not to others outside who have no right encroaching on hers. 11. No argument there, either. Many of the animals on our planet are self-aware entities in their own right, also. 12. On the death penalty, there is no argument one can make in favor of it that makes any sense whatsoever. Economically it is better not to have it. There is no moral argument in favor of the death penalty that can stand up to scrutiny unless one bases their ideas in the biblical standards -- a place where a lot of worms dwell. The death penalty can be considered nothing more than state sponsored murder. 13. This is an extension of 12. The answer is simple, but requires the answer to be formed as a question. Why should anyone have the right to kill another viable human being (again, somewhat different from the issue of abortion)? 14. Possibly, but how would it be determined they had done so and who would make that determination? On the other hand, there is more than adequate evidence that the death penalty is something of a reward to many so convicted and sentenced. 15. No, we don't get to order a life specifically intended to give us pleasure. Life entails everything for everyone and with no particular favor shown to anyone. What apparent favor there is is the result of human constructs such as economic status (which includes membership in royal families, sons and daughters of the president, etc.), caste or class distinctions, etc. 16. Each of us is allowed to make decisions about how we view our lives and what comes along with them. Some of us choose to opt out, some of us ...
Even though I'm agnostic, I like to go to religious events sometimes. I like being around people who...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
I suggest that there are far better ways to pursue wisdom. What wisdom one finds among all the religions is narrow, limited, and absolutist, thus it is not real wisdom but wise thoughts that fit within the constraints of religion.
Van Gogh or Picasso
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
I chose Picasso because I like my ears and I love ballerinas. I have a story about a Picasso I once owned. Wanna hear it?
Just read Agnostic.com`s question on FB "Do you believe in magic?" Not as cut and dried as we might ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Nope. I've never done that, but I must say I like your choice of 273kelvin. Not many will pick up on that.
Tough One: What is One of Your Completely Original Thoughts?
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
I have had several, but I can't allow them to become public knowledge because then they would not be completely original. No. Wait. That isn't quite right. Um ... I've had several, but I don't want to divulge them. Yeah, that sounds better. Like I'm keeping my incredibly original thoughts to myself. No. Wait. What reason would I have for that? I mean, I'm not a selfish person, so that would be out of character for me. Okay, damn it, I'll come clean. I've never had a completely original idea. All right? Is that better? Are you satisfied now?
Who believes as i do of aliens visited earth and they were made out to be gods, only because of ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Having read the comments, I am dumbfounded. Maybe there is no hope for our species after all. With the slightest knowledge of evolution, biology, genetics, history, technology, and science, such ideas crumble to dust, yet we still have people who lock onto this idea that aliens came here to make us what we are and give us the technology to reach the stars. I find these notions to be nearly indistinguishable from other superstitious beliefs. I grant you that one cannot rule out that Earth may have been visited at some time by someone or something, but we have no evidence of that and we can't automatically conclude that if they came here they had to do something. So, belief in this is based on no evidence just as all the other god myths and outright fictions. It is fun to conjecture on these ideas, but that is the stuff best left to us Science Fiction writers and not grabbed at as a 'plausible' explanation for things that have already been explained quite well in the world of real science.
Religions without faith
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
re·li·gion ... noun: the belief in and worship of a superhuman or supernatural controlling power, especially a personal god or gods. synonyms: faith, belief, worship, creed; More: sect, church, cult, denomination a particular system of faith and worship. a pursuit or interest to which someone ascribes supreme importance. "consumerism is the new religion" So, within the context of what constitutes a religion, I can't think of a single example. Confucianism and Buddhism began as living philosophies, but it wasn't long after the founders died that they became religions, replete with all the supernatural trappings. Unitarianism is an example of an attempt to legitimize religion in the real world. Bah...! Humbug...!
Olaf Stapledon and STARMAKER In 1937 Olaf Stapledon published STARMAKER, a philosophical ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
For anyone able to overlook dated and sometimes rigid language, Stapledon's work is sheer delight. As for Star Maker, one needs to be able to suspend disbelief when it comes to the mode of travel, but it is made a bit easier if one realizes the travel is nothing but a literary device to get to the meat on the bones of an incredible and profound piece of writing. @SKDeitch, how is it you came across his work? Oh, and you are right, it is one of the best pieces of philosophy cum creative writing ever done.
Who believes as i do of aliens visited earth and they were made out to be gods, only because of ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Highly doubtful. Almost on a par with the likelihood of an actual deity.
If you could change ONE thing about yourself, what would it be?
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
WARNING: Flippant response. I'd change the level of my bank account.
Please share one awesome thing about where you live. :)
evidentialist comments on Dec 3, 2017:
Uh ... well ... nothing, Kreig. Two to three hours drive from here we have the Carlsbad Caverns, also the loony bin known as Roswell where the little gray aliens crashed. Sorry, without a major trip, that's it. Well, unless you can be thrilled by oil wells and cracking plants.
Just saw this 78 second video that just blew my mind. Never in my wildest dreams did I think I'd ...
evidentialist comments on Dec 2, 2017:
Really, really old news, @davtim68. They've already returned a few from LEO launches. 100% success rate. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIJ2-91ydrg

Photos

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Conference: Fact vs Fiction -- 2001
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My wife: Julieta
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Granddaughter: Ayrie Pauline Chaboya
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My youngest daughter: Alexandra Rachel Jacobs-Chaboya
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My eldest daughter: Leah Kelly when she was 3 years old in our stilt house at the west end of Galveston Island, TX in 1969
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My eldest daughter, Leah Kelly with me at the studio in 1968. Yes, she actually knew a few chords when she was a little over 2 years old.
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My son, Oscar, when he was playing police officer in 2002. Datsa my boy.
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My grandson, Logan Jay Chaboya and Gramps performing an experiment. We luvs science.
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Me in front of 'the wall' in 2004
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Copied from a newspaper article in which I was featured during Astronomy Day at the UACJ in 1999. I was lecturing on impact mechanics and how to identify meteorites in the field. At the university I also displayed my meager collection of meteorites and related materials.
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Founding members at the signing of the papers of incorporation of the Planetary Society: Carl Sagan (seated to the right), Bruce Murray (seated to the left), and Louis Friedman (standing on the left). The man standing to the right is Harry Ashmore, an advisor, who greatly helped in the founding of the Society. Ashmore was a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and leader in the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and 70s. What a fun group. Never a dull moment.
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Upper left: The four room farmhouse in which I was raised. Top right: Lovely little me on a rarely seen city sidewalk. Lower left: Me and my hotrod. Center: Aunt Lou, little sister, Lou, with me seated behind, and cousin Skipper with our 1927 Oakland Landau Sedan. Lower middle: Uncle Leroy riding my back. Lower right: Me and my tough row to hoe.
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A rather odd tale of first contact with a strange twist.
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The Earth travels in a random shooting gallery and one never knows.
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"Xenogenesis is one of those rare books that manages to catch even the most jaded of sci-fi readers off-guard. Somewhere between the description of cities in stratified levels of wealth and the injection of nano-machines, we realize we are somewhere between the world we inhabit and the world we only dream about, which makes the entire book something beyond a simple novel of escape. This combination of biotechnology and space travel with a hefty dose of hard-boiled detective fiction in the character of Patrick Dalworthy allows Jacobs to create a work that is both fantastic and close to home, one that tackles the subject of what it truly means to be human in a rapidly advancing world and answer it with aplomb." ~ Jamie A. Hughes
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IN THIS INCREDIBLE, SWEEPING SAGA across thousands of years and hundreds of light years we come face to face with our fears and deep prejudices. It is here, in SEEDS OF MEMORY, that we get an idea of what it means to be "HUMAN" and what "HUMAN" really means. It is here, in SEEDS OF MEMORY, that we are confronted with the need to know colliding head-on with reality. Are we, HOMO SAPIENS SAPIENS, truly the only form that humans can take, and is our history the only history? Might there not be others, or others created out of the very stuff of life who are, after all, our brothers and sisters?kith and kin? In this story we find that the lines that divide have indistinct, fuzzy edges, and that we are the ones who make those divisions. Here we discover humanity at its magnificent best, its seething worst, and everything imaginable between, while we make an uncertain attempt to reunite two peoples separated by time and space...and other things.
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The follow-on to Storm Cloud Rising. Maelstrom and the third book have been included into the first book of the trilogy so that it is now a single novel.
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My short story, CLOUD, appears in this anthology.
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My short story, I NEVER SCREAM, is in this anthology.
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My short story, GOD SHIP, can be found here.
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Agnostic, Atheist, Humanist, Secularist, Skeptic, Freethinker
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