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LINK The bad news on human nature, in 10 findings from psychology | Aeon Ideas

By Tomfoolery339
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6 comments

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1

If you take this article too serious you are guilty of selection bias. We shouldn't only focus on the negative. There is also evidence that sheds "human nature" in a better light. We shouldn't ignore those point but see them in a broader context. Also, as it has been pointed out, this says nothing of the individual but only about groups of people.

Dietl Level 7 Dec 7, 2018

I agree. I just thought it was an interesting article.

2

Well my friend, I don't want bad news right now so pass... ?

I understand.

2

There's a dark side to everyone, but the fact that we consider these things bad means there's a good side to everyone as well. It's up to us, then, to balance these things out. No one can be 100% consistent, but generally people are self aware enough to attempt to avoid hypocrisy, for example.

As for the article, I can appreciate the acceptance of the flaws in human nature (because, lets face it, humans are capable of being brutal, savage, apathetic monsters), but it misrepresents most of it's points.

For example, the "We would rather electrocute ourselves than spend time in our own thoughts" point refers a study that tests the brain's tolerance for boredom where people were left in a room with nothing but a button that electrocutes the user. Since one of your brain's defense mechanisms against depression and degradation of mental sanity is to avoid boredom (in the study referred to as a lack of stimuli), it makes sense that, in a room with only one type of stimulus, aka pain, the brain will eventually opt for a bad stimulus rather than no stimulus at all. The experiment, therefore, is only able to test the tolerance to boredom. This test, by the way, is an example of why depressed people sometimes harm themselves.
By this article's logic, you can deduce that people actively want to spent time in their own thoughts because the large majority of people who try desensitization chambers (a soundproof chamber where you are deprived of any stimuli by being suspended in a shallow pool of tepid salt water with no light) report it to be relaxing and don't actively attempt to get out, with a portion of said people opting to repeat the treatment.

If the basic logic is flawed, the conclusion in unreliable, therefore one would have to find an appropriate test to correct it.

kasmian Level 7 Dec 6, 2018

I had my doubts about that one myself. Some of the others seemed more likely.

1

Well, that's disheartening.

1

Interesting but uhhhh I’m not a fan of broad stroking entire segments of society based upon percentage analysis.

1

My pessimistic self finds that absolutely spot on true

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