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How has coming out as an atheist affect you? (To those who grew up or ate growing up in relgious household or communities)

By GodlessMind3
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10 comments

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3

I lost a few relatives decades ago, in the fallout from me realizing I'm atheist. No big deal. I'm happier without their judgmental hate talk. Their loss. Funny thing though, now I see that their kids, now grown up, are atheist too. Haha - so much for them trying to protect their kids from interacting with their "evil" atheist aunt. Just ahead of their time, I guess.

Julie808 Level 7 Dec 31, 2018
3

I lost friends and relatives but I gained so much more. Freedom of thought, action, and choice is priceless.

1

I am an Atheist ...none of my friends ,religious or not, judge! That is why they are and will always be, my friends. I don’t judge them either !

bubaj50 Level 7 Dec 31, 2018

Your lucky then

0

Not yet!! It doesn’t affect me, but I confidently will expect someone who will be judged of my identity as atheist. I am profoundly deaf in the small community. My journey will be firmly not easy as long as getting easier later.

Guy77 Level 4 Jan 1, 2019
0

Having been a practicing Mormon for 47 years I finally feel free. I am fortunate that my devout Mormon husband of 50 years is accepting of my coming-out as a non believer. I like some faith gradually but finally, 3 years ago I had to be genuine with my loss of faith in a physical, anthropomorphic diety.
It feels absolutely freeing to not be required to put my faith in a supreme being and a religious paradigm.

1

My father didn’t speak to me for around 6 months and didn’t get around to saying “I love you” for several years. He was the worst of it. Other friends who are believers blocked me on FaceBook and plenty loved and treated me just like normal. Most people I would say, continued to care about and love me for who I am. The negative ones were the exception, and while that hurt, it also revealed the sort of people i truly wanted to be connected to based on their character.

Grenage Level 4 Jan 3, 2019
0

My family were divided my father emotionally crippled by the war rarely spoke and I only found out after his death that he had attended Salvation army meetings My mother had her own personal god whom she could set on to other people she truly believed that her personal god had broken the arm of a woman who cheeked her my brother and I used to laugh we had a big cold house and each of us was sitting by our selves reading mainly. No one ever asked me about god so I didn't bother him and he did'n t bother me. I now live in Northern Ireland and its strange how no one does ask in what must be one of hte major hubs of protestant v catholicism

jacpod Level 8 Jan 5, 2019
0

My rejection of religion came before my atheism, which caused most people in my religion to shun me, including some relatives. Although it felt like a loss at first, it made me realize that those who shunned me never friends. So, becoming an atheist wasn't a big deal to my remaining friends and acquaintances. Beyond that issue, everything else in my life improved.

sfvpool Level 7 Jan 5, 2019
0

I grew up and still live in a city that is 99% Hispanic and almost everybody is either Catholic or Christian including my own family. I completed my first communion around age 11 and after that I just couldn't stop questioning everything. I hated when people told me that everything that happened was God's plan when they didn't have any answers to my questions.
My family loves me so they accept me as I am, but they are not happy that I'm atheist. They just stay silent whenever I speak about my humanist beliefs. My dad on the other hand (although he never goes to church) was up upset and looked at me with pity when he found out, which was gut wrenching.
It can be lonely being a non believer but that's what makes organizations like this great!

0

it was no big thing for me or my wife it was simply what we believed. So far my children and their children have accepted the same beliefs.

Marine Level 8 Jan 11, 2019
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