Agnostic.com

23 0

How much of the bible have you read?

View Results
ScubaWags 7 Jan 7

Post a comment Reply Add Photo

Enjoy being online again!

Welcome to the community of good people who base their values on evidence and appreciate civil discourse - the social network you will enjoy.

Create your free account

23 comments

Feel free to reply to any comment by clicking the "Reply" button.

0

I think it is a good idea for everyone to read the Bible. It's part of being educated, don't you think? There are so many references in popular culture and in literature that you won't understand if you have no familiarity with these books. And it's definitely useful for agnostics or atheists to know what and why they are not. : )

0

Read the whole thing in different translations , found it wanting ,
Read the Tao , Hindi books , much more to life

0

Thanks for replying to my long comment. I am curious as to what religion you were brought up in and if you had regular bible classes, straight from the bible? It's interesting that from what I've heard, most Protestants are encouraged to read the bible. I wonder why Protestants don't have the same fears about their flocks reading the bible than the Roman Catholic Church has?

0

Love this....very good speech about Bible
[facebook.com]

1

Have a friend who is Southern Baptist who was shocked that I had read the entire Bible, where he had not. I was young and still spotted contradictions in the bible and even bigger ones when it comes to the way churches teach it.
I have to say I have read some of the Vedic verses, Eddas and others. Most are better reads than the Bible.

0

Bits and pieces. I could NOT quote scripture. But I do know a bit about it from learning. I'd like to learn a LOT more just for my arsenal.

It is fun to quote scripture to someone who assumes that your atheist just because you "haven't heard he good word".

0

A couple times for KJV. Read parts of other versions for comparison. Also read Torah and other Abrahamic writings. Finally gave up because it was never going to make sense.

I don't think I'd be able to read the KJV. I had a hard enough time paying attention as it was.

1

Couldn't get through Genesis without getting hung up on the contradictory explanation of the creation of Eve and other unanswered questions. Did God create 'man, he and she alike' or from the rib of Adam? If the Old Testament is taken from the Jewish scriptures, why are some things glossed over or removed? Without logic, I abandoned trying.

0

Enough, thank you. 🙂

0

Read it twice. Its rather silly.

1

I have read the entire thing; but this was when I was having doubts about it and wanted to know what was actually in it--cover to cover. It was incredibly tedious at times, but I made it through.

tedious is an understatement

0

I couldn't get past all the "begat" nonsense. Besides, I only like reading non-fiction.

0

At one time, I really wanted to believe. I just can't. My sister read something about a genetic component that allows some to suspend disbelief but not everyone has it. I evidently don't. I did, however, read the Bible cover to cover with the exception of skimming Numbers. The more I read, the more I disbelieved. So little made sense. I guess I lack the ability to read it with my heart rather than my brain. Ha.

I hope you didn't miss the talking donkey in Numbers

2

Sad to say but I once believed in it so I read it. One bright point is that it did help me become atheist.

gearl Level 7 Jan 7, 2018

The road to atheism is paved in bibles read from cover to cover.

2

It was compulsory reading when I was at school and I loathed it. I don't have to drink cyanide to know that it is poisonous. Would I read it cover to cover, again, so I could debate it with the believers and prolong the horror story?

I use to read Grimm's Fairy Tales to my daughter. When I read Hansel and Gretel and I came to the part where the wood cutter abandoned the children in the woods, my daughter asked me: "'daddy did he really abandon the children in the woods?" When I replied yes she said: "That's wicked, now read it again."

3

I've read the bible as little as possible. I was sent to Roman Catholic elementary and high school. The Catholic Church does NOT emphasize reading the bible, for good reasons! We had something like a child's reader in elementary school with pictures and the Catholic version of the New Testament. The Old Testament was never even mentioned. Surprise, surprise! Of course I went to school back in the l950s. Things may be different now, but I'd be surprised if the Catholic Church urged their flocks to read the bible today. The Matthew, Mark, Luke and John versions of the bible are quite different from one another. No one knows who really wrote them, except that the authors were Greek. The Jewish people at the time the bibles were written, spoke a language known as Aramaic. From what I've read, Aramaic is a very poetic language and words can have several different meanings. Scholars know this since there are still several small pockets of people who speak Aramaic in the Middle East today. So, to make a long story, shorter, the "accepted" Christian versions of the bible were written by people who lived many years after the death of Jesus (if he existed at all) and Aramaic was a second language for the bible's authors. So how reliable can they be? Both the Old Testament and the New Testament are mythology, not history. I don't think they were ever meant to be taken literally. Since I loved history as a child, I did outside reading about the early "Jesus Movement" and the development of the Roman Catholic Church. I doubt whether the Catholic Church would want its adherents to learn about such things as the Inquisition and other "horror" stories from its past. "Amen."

That's funny that the Catholic church does not really want you to read the bible. The church I grew up in would present all of the teens who completed their Profession of Faith, and would challenge them to wear it out from reading it. Of course no one ever did.

0

The problem with the Bible is it starts with the Old Testament. After forcing myself through that, I ran out of willpower.

you didn't really miss much

1

As a small child, my parents used the illustrated Children's Bible for bedtime stories. ...Yeah, think about that.
As a teen, I read it on my own, in its entirety.
Now after 2 decades of non-belief, I refer to isolated scriptural references from time to time to make a point about Christian ridiculousness, inconsistencies, and outright horrendous morals. See? It's still useful! 🙂

3

Cover to cover several times, often against the wishes of my southern baptist family, too many peers and finally my southern baptist professors. (Don't ask...or I'll tell!)

How many times did I say back then "anyone who believes the buybull can't have possibly critically read the whole thing."

Not as many as I'd have liked, I assure you of that!

Usually with a baptist concordance but my favorite annotation, the "tell it like it is" of all time, is the Skeptics' Annotated Bible. A barrel of inconsistencies, absurdities and laughs from Genesis 1.1. I highly recommended it to anyone who wants to debate theists (they have a quran and book of moron, too!) on their own turf while being entertained in the process!

[skepticsannotatedbible.com]

I've heard of the Skeptics Annotated Bible, but haven't seen it until now. Seems pretty cool.

0

Read most when I was a pre-teen and found it very confusing. I've forgotten most of it since I gave up on church when I was thirteen.

Betty Level 7 Jan 7, 2018
2

Read it cover to cover a few times, but then read parts of it hundreds of times for bible study lesson prep, that kind of thing.

1

Need another option. Ten years of Jewish Sunday School nightmare-remember this much-a book titled Pathways through the Bible which translated into modern day English, focusing completely on Old Testament and how it related to Judaism.

2

I don't usually read fiction.

Write Comment
You can include a link to this post in your posts and comments by including the text q:13401
Agnostic does not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content. Read full disclaimer.