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1

No comment from the PD? Not very good journalism to only state one side of the issue.....
Bias agenda much?

I agree with Veteran229 on this. The overarching issue here is NOT systematic racism. It is how police deal with mental illness, particularly suicide-by-cop. I 100% agree that Stephen Mader was in the right. He should receive a commendation, not a pink slip. Ronald Williams wanted to be killed, and his girlfriend called the police because he was suicidal. The officer who shot him did so because of a policy to shoot first and think later. Had Williams been any other ethnicity, he would still be dead.

The Washington Post wrote a much better article about it in February [washingtonpost.com]. Systematic racism amongst police is a very real problem I personally experienced. But the Grio article here basically looked at an issue about mental illness and called it racism, seeing nothing but the race of Williams and Mader.

I agree that the Weirton Police Department was completely, tragically wrong and was rightfully sued. However to call this an example of systematic racism is bullshit. It dilutes real examples of racism and downplays an equally critical issue of how police deal with the mentally ill. Not very good journalism.

3

There is a reason why police in the UK do not carry guns. Way too much testosterone flying about

1

What if I was to ask any of you to tell me what the use of continuum is? How does it work? And who decides what it should say?
Honestly I don’t believe that without looking it up no more than 3 people on this site could probably answer those questions.

I actually asked 5 members of black lives matter in a community meeting if they could answer those same questions.

1 knew what the use of force continuum was but because it was brought up in a court case against a cop who had shot a friend of his and seemed to be all they needed to hear in order to not prosecute him.

And guess what folks that’s it absolutely it. The cop involved in this story was within his right to not shoot as the suspect involved didn’t harm anyone else.
But per the post 9/11 use of force continuum he could’ve shot that man in the head and not one court in this country could prosecute him.

Because it would’ve been within the scope of his duties and did not exceed the acceptable amount of force authorized within the use of force continuum.

So let’s back up here for a sec. The use of continuum is a guideline set by the U S Dept of Justice what it does is say that under these circumstances any law enforcement officer can respond to a threat even a perceived threat with a certain degree of force. Lethal or non lethal

So I’m sure that everyone remembers Rodney King right? If not then please look him up. Anyway before the L A riots law enforcement was permitted beat or shoot a suspect until they were subdued.
Which is why the world got to see several officers clubbing on King the way did and for the amount of time for which they did.

Now after that the DOJ worked with specialist to create a newer and more user friendly version of the use of force continuum and what they developed was a ladder that officers had to systematically work through before they could just up and shoot someone.

They had to de escalate each potentially violent situation and could only meet force with an equal amount of force. Meaning if I’ve only got my fist clinched and threatening to punch a cop then he/she could only use non lethal force and even then verbally de escalating the situation.

Even if the suspect has a gun you de escalate and draw your weapon unless they raise theirs. The goal was to peacefully apprehend individuals with little to no force being used.
And for the most part worked it really started to change the attitudes between law enforcement and minority citizens.

Which wasn’t welcomed by everyone mostly sheriffs who don’t have to have actual law enforcement experience to be the boss. They wanted the steps removed because they didn’t have to talk with these individuals they criminals And needed to treated as such.

We on 9/11/2001 they got their wish. Within weeks of the attacks the DOJ rewrote the use of force continuum to simply and clearly state that all that is required of a law enforcement officer is to perceive that there’s an imminent and deadly threat to theirs or of those in the immediate area to use whatever even if all means necessary to eliminate the threat.

Meaning that if I believe that you have a weapon and you might attempt to kill me with it I don’t have to talk to you, tase you, spray you, strike with a baton, have several officers gang tackle you in order to cuff you. I can simply withdraw my weapon shoot you until you’re stopped.

And as I told everyone at that community meeting that a lot of deaths could’ve been prevented or at some officers would be incarcerated if the DOJ had used the word” terrorist “ in front the word threat.

So people it’s simply cause and effect which I know is an ancient form of thinking but if we identify the cause of a problem then we can effectively prevent the effect. Good news is that several cities have taken upon themselves to reintroduce the pre 9/11 use of force continuum into their departments but and I know with the magical carrot in the White House this might seem impossible but if enough pressure was applied upon the DOJ they might feel compelled to make those changes.

But it’s easier to yell racism and fascism so I wouldn’t be surprised if no one ever does say anything to them.

2

According to this source the man was armed, but this officer tried to diffuse the situation peacefully. Then backup arrived and they shot when the man lifted his gun. I'd say the only person to blame here is the superior who fired a cop who did nothing wrong.
Not sure if race had anything to do with this particular case, though, since the justification given was based on behavior which matches the description of the situation, even if i find said justification unreasonable. I'd love to see the track record of this superior officer, though... If there's a pattern of violence against black people, the man should be fired, as he clearly isn't fit for the job.

3

Police treatment of black people is criminal, devastating to families across the country. To whoever is reading this (and I read the article and get the context of who called the police) please don’t ever call the police on a black person. You are putting their life in danger.

What if there's a guy with a knife trying to kick down your door and he happens to be black? I don't think what happened here was right, but if someone is genuinely threatening your life, you should get help, no?

@kasmian listen to me brother. You’re not from here. I am telling you if you live in the United States and you call the cops on a black man you are writing his death sentence. Your example shows you’re not serious about the problem.

@Bobbyzen Wow, calm down, man. I'm just trying not to paint with broad brushes over these things. From the number of times it happens, it's clear america has a problem with cops shooting black people, but I don't see how generalizing helps solve the problem. I mean, here you have an example of a cop trying to do the right thing, even when dealing with an armed man and you basically just said that, if someone could get hurt and the aggressor happens to be black, they should risk being hurt and possibly killed. How is my question in any way not valid? I mean, you could propose other means of defending one's self against a possible aggressor without calling the cops, but instead, you literally tell me that I'm not from your country and therefore shouldn't be allowed to talk about the problem.
That's bordering on racism. How can you expect me to take your words seriously?

@kasmian I have children of color in my family. Their mother fears for their lives when they leave the house for school or work or recreation. So please stop fussing. Just stop.

@Bobbyzen Going that route, my mother's black and I talk to her about this all the time. The bottom line is your suggestion hurts more people than it helps if you don't provide a solution. Instead of making an actual point, you shout down opposing opinions. Newsflash: that's how you contribute to the opposing side's numbers.

@kasmian Many black men are killed or put in danger when white people call the cops on them because they feel threatened. Tamir Rice is one tragic example. I’m not shouting anyone down, I’m pleading for people to not call the cops on black people because cops shoot them. The example in the story is of one good cop who didn’t shoot and was fired for it. My message and my solution couldn’t be any clearer. FYI I also work with many social justice groups, one of which is working to elect prosecutors who will hold police accountable when they do shoot black people. Because this problem is not going away anytime soon.

@Bobbyzen Looked it up and yes, Tamir Rice was indeed a tragic and unjust victim. That said, there is something to be said when it comes to acting like the police are actively attempting to shoot black people.
Cops are humans just like you or me. The problem is usually not the officers themselves, but with the relation between the police and the citizens. If a black kid is raised thinking the cops will actively want to shoot him, he'll act hostile in the presence of an officer. In a country where guns are legal, this is a bad idea. Cops have a list of orders to follow in these situations: Deal with any immediate danger, disarm everyone, make sure the situation is safe for everyone and then perform any arrests needed. That's why this story is so fucked up. The guy was probably thinking he was gonna get shot if he was unarmed and he ended up getting shot because he didn't drop his gun.

I don't usually agree with him, but I'd advise you to check this youtuber out when you have the time:

. He is an ex-swat and, even if he does say a lot of shit I disagree with, it's a good channel when you try to get the perspective of the cops when it comes to shootings and stuff. He's also a pretty cool guy to talk with, so if you yourself or anyone you know feels like debating this kind of stuff, you should contact him.

All this said I'd argue that the solution is not fighting the police or not calling them when you might feel in danger, but instead working with them to make sure there's fair treatment for everyone. There are a lot of good people who go into that line of work because they wanna do what's right and pushing them away will only make things worse for both the citizens and the cops.

On a side note, thank you for acting respectfully.

@kasmian I gave you one example of hundreds, and you respond that black kids need to act more respectfully to avoid being shot. That's called victim blaming. I could provide you with a list of cases of police shooting unarmed black people and you will find ways to blame the victims. You will post ex-cops explaining how black kids can avoid being shot.

You do not follow shootings of unarmed black people as I have over the years. You may not have read the studies that teachers characterize black kids who act out as aggressive and threatening, and characterize white kids who act out in exactly the same manner as "boys will be boys."

Please stop justifying the shooting of unarmed black men. Please. Please.

@Bobbyzen I'm not justifying the shooting of unarmed black men and I'm not blaming the victims. I'm simply saying that it's not as simple as "the cops are bad". Stawmaning my position gets us nowhere and, since I'm trying to understand your side of the story, i'd appreciate if you at least tried understanding mine instead of reading "we should be fair to everyone" as "we should support the cops, fuck black people". It's dishonest and it justifies the stereotype that social justice is only for extremists.

Furthermore, I posted a channel that explains the cop's side of the debate. I did NOT suggest black kids should be blamed for getting shot. I ask you, then: How the fuck do you hope to save lives and help people if your solution is to ignore one of the sides and be a zealot to the other? You don't save a man from burning by drowning him, and you don't help a possible victim by depriving them of the information and means that can save their life.

@kasmian Instead of asking me to understand why cops shoot unarmed black people, ask the mothers and children of the victims: Jordan Edwards, shot dead by a cop in the back of the head as the car full of unarmed young black men he was a passenger in was driving away from a party. Philando Castile, shot dead by a cop after being pulled over allegedly for a taillight that was out and for "looking like" a burglar from a robbery days before. Botham Jean, shot dead in his own apartment by an off-duty cop who claimed she thought he was in her apartment. Anton Sterling. Mike Brown. Terence Crutcher. Samuel DuBose. Sandra Bland. Freddie Gray. Walter L. Scott. Akai Gurley. Laquan McDonald. These are just a handful of more high-profile cases...

@Bobbyzen
So i did some research and this is what i found:
Jordan Edwards: According to all the reports I could find, the cop misused his firearm, was fired and sent to 15 years in prison. The cop was punished like he should have been.
Philando Castile: The officer thought the victim was reaching for a gun when he was getting his license after being told to keep his hands in clear view. The officer admitted he was wrong to shoot the man and you can tell from the body cam footage he could hardly deal with what he had done. He was fired and won't be allowed to work in the police force again.
Botham Jean: The officer was off-duty and used her firearm illegally, resulting in a man's death. Was fired, sentenced for manslaughter.
Anton Sterling: (could only find the case of Alton Sterling, so I assume you misspelled his name) Was being arrested for threatening another man with a firearm. While resisting arrest, Sterling reached for a gun in his pocket and was shot before drawing it. An investigation was opened to make sure the shooting was necessary and, after reviewing several recordings of the incident, it was ruled that the officers acted in a "reasonable and justifiable manner".
Mike Brown: Attacked an officer and attempted to take his gun. He then fled and the officer pursued with the intent to arrest him. After Brown turned and charged the officer, another fight ensued resulting in the officer eventually shooting Brown.
Terence Crutcher: Refused to show his hands, constantly reaching into his pocket while police told him to keep his hands up. After minutes of warnings, instead of following orders, Crutcher reached into his car and the officers shot him.
Samuel DuBose: Was pulled over for missing his license plate and having a suspended driver's license. We attempted to drive off and, instead of chasing him, the officer shot DuBose. The officer was charged with manslaughter and fired.
Sandra Bland: Was arrested for assaulting a police officer after a traffic violation. Committed suicide in jail.
Freddie Gray: Was arrested, but not properly secured in the police van. He sustained spinal injuries resulting in his death and the officers were charged with homicide.
Walter L. Scott: Was shot while fleeing the police. The officer lied in the report, was found out and was charged for not following police protocol.
Akai Gurley: The officer shot him without reason, was charged with manslaughter after a flimsy attempt at a lie to cover his own ass.
Laquan McDonald: Was behaving erratically with a knife in the middle of the street. An officer shot him in the back and was charged with manslaughter when the body cam footage was released.

In short: Jordan Edwards, Philando Castile, Botham Jean, Freddie Gray, Akai Gurley, and Laquan McDonald were victims of police malpractice and the officers responsible, who didn't follow any of the protocol required for these types of situations, were charged and punished accordingly. Alton Sterling and Mike Brown were criminals who endangered people around them and tried to kill the officers. Terence Crutcher didn't follow any of the officer's orders and acted suspiciously (this is where fearing the police puts these people in danger the most) resulting in his unnecessary death. Sandra Bland was properly arrested and committed suicide. Racism might have been a factor in a couple of these cases (Freddie Gray's case is clearly the most probable in this regard) but, in most of them, racism isn't even a factor.
The main problem, as I said, is the disconnect between the citizens and the police which can only be fixed by working with the cops and with the people to develop mutual trust. Being afraid of and aggressive towards the police results in unnecessary violence, yet your solution is more fear. Now please refrain from rhetoric if you choose to respond.

Edit: Also think twice before you acuse someone of being misinformed without any proof of it.

@kasmian Congratulations on your research. Much of what you read is incorrect and/or incomplete. Philando Castile's murderer, Officer Yanez, was acquitted of all charges on June 16, 2017 and was fired the next day. You wrote, "and won't be allowed to work in the police force again." But he can work for another police department. It happens all the time.So where is the justice for Philando Castile? He was a cafeteria worker at a local Montessori grade school. His kids loved him, showed up for him at various rallies and memorials after his death. He was a provider for his girlfriend's 4-year-old daughter, who was in the back seat when Yanez fired 7 bullets at Castile, who by the way had a license to carry a firearm and, by protocol, advised officer Yanez that he was licensed to carry and had a firearm in the car, at which point Yanez shot and killed Castile, one bullet flying past the 4-year-old's head. And for this, the officer was acquitted and fired, but again, could get a job in another police department, which happens frequently when officers are found to be abusive and act against police protocols. This one murder alone, without consequences for the murderer except for losing his job, should be a red flag that there are serious systemic problems in U.S. policing. And the 4 year old is without her surrogate Dad, and had to witness his murder. Roy Oliver, Jordan Edwards' murderer, did not "misuse his firearm," as you wrote. He shot Edwards in cold blood. He's the first police officer to be convicted out of of hundreds of shootings of black men in Texas. His case is on appeal. More, Oliver and his police chief lied about the encounter, twice, and the truth came out only because there was a dashcam that exposed the lies (Oliver first claimed the car was speeding backwards toward him and he feared for his life. After the dashcam was released, his story changed to saying the car was speeding towards his partner and he feared for his partner's life and shot Edwards. His partner testified in court that his life was never in danger - an extremely rare occurrence in U.S. policing where the police force and its union did not unconditionally support the shooting officer). Were it not for the dashcam, he would have gotten away with murder. Police are known to disable their body- and dashcams before encounters, by the way, and that technology is relatively new, so we really don't know the scope of the problem of police killing unarmed black people and getting away with it because of the version of the story they tell, which always includes, "I feared for my life." That excuse is codified, giving virtual immunity to police. Jordan Edwards was a high school teenager with no criminal record, not that that should matter; having a record does not give police a legal or moral justification for a shooting. Botham Jean's murderer was NOT sentenced for manslaughter. Where did you read that? She was originally charged with manslaughter, but the grand jury changed the charge to murder just this last week. The murderer was out on bail the same day. That's justice? Let's see what happens at trial, hopefully a conviction with a life sentence, the least Jean's family deserves after losing a son. I could go on with the incomplete/slanted synopses you discovered, each of which omits the humanity of the victim, but I'm working. However, here are three more cases you can research. And there are several hundred more which, if you look beyond official accounts, will show the depth of the problem.

@kasmian Congratulations on your research. Much of what you read is incorrect and/or incomplete. Philando Castile's murderer, Officer Yanez, was acquitted of all charges on June 16, 2017 and was fired the next day. You wrote, "and won't be allowed to work in the police force again." But he can work for another police department. It happens all the time.So where is the justice for Philando Castile? He was a cafeteria worker at a local Montessori grade school. His kids loved him, showed up for him at various rallies and memorials after his death. He was a provider for his girlfriend's 4-year-old daughter, who was in the back seat when Yanez fired 7 bullets at Castile, who by the way had a license to carry a firearm and, by protocol, advised officer Yanez that he was licensed to carry and had a firearm in the car, at which point Yanez shot and killed Castile, one bullet flying past the 4-year-old's head. And for this, the officer was acquitted and fired, but again, could get a job in another police department, which happens frequently when officers are found to be abusive and act against police protocols. This one murder alone, without consequences for the murderer except for losing his job, should be a red flag that there are serious systemic problems in U.S. policing. And the 4 year old is without her surrogate Dad, and had to witness his murder. Roy Oliver, Jordan Edwards' murderer, did not "misuse his firearm," as you wrote. He shot Edwards in cold blood. He's the first police officer to be convicted out of of hundreds of shootings of black men in Texas. His case is on appeal. More, Oliver and his police chief lied about the encounter, twice, and the truth came out only because there was a dashcam that exposed the lies (Oliver first claimed the car was speeding backwards toward him and he feared for his life. After the dashcam was released, his story changed to saying the car was speeding towards his partner and he feared for his partner's life and shot Edwards. His partner testified in court that his life was never in danger - an extremely rare occurrence in U.S. policing where the police force and its union did not unconditionally support the shooting officer). Were it not for the dashcam, he would have gotten away with murder. Police are known to disable their body- and dashcams before encounters, by the way, and that technology is relatively new, so we really don't know the scope of the problem of police killing unarmed black people and getting away with it because of the version of the story they tell, which always includes, "I feared for my life." That excuse is codified, giving virtual immunity to police. Jordan Edwards was a high school teenager with no criminal record, not that that should matter; having a record does not give police a legal or moral justification for a shooting. Botham Jean's murderer was NOT sentenced for manslaughter. Where did you read that? She was originally charged with manslaughter, but the grand jury changed the charge to murder just this last week. The murderer was out on bail the same day. That's justice? Let's see what happens at trial, hopefully a conviction with a life sentence, the least Jean's family deserves after losing a son. I could go on with the incomplete/slanted synopses you discovered, each of which omits the humanity of the victim, but I'm working. However, here are three more cases you can research. And there are several hundred more which, if you look beyond official accounts, will show the depth of the problem.

@Bobbyzen Firstly, I did misread the Botham Jean case. Apologies. Either way, she was charged with murder, which is fitting because she shot the man while off duty, making it a civilian case instead of abuse from a position of power and therefore murder, not manslaughter.

So your problem is not with police brutality, but with the lack of punishment for police brutality? In that case, it's a fair point, but not calling the police doesn't fix that and spreading fear makes things even worse. Given your arguments, I should make it clear: I'm not saying these things don't happen, I'm disagreeing about how you intend to deal with them. So far, your arguments have only dealt with punishing cops when in most cases I've seen (by which I mean recordings of these incidents from either body cams or civilians) the problem stems from people not following police directions out of fear which, tragically, leads to the realization of their fears. You can tell it's fear because, while the police order the suspect to drop whatever they're carrying and either get on the ground or turn around and walk backward, they refuse to do so crying out that they'll get shot if they do. Yet, if you look up footage of people getting arrested without being shot, they either obey the officer or they get forcefully arrested but are otherwise unharmed. This is why informing people about how to react to police orders is far better than simply saying that "the police are bad and they will shoot you", even if it isn't the perfect solution.
That's why I linked the video a few comments back. If you understand the point of view of the officers as much as the point of view of the victims and their families, you realize how the problem isn't rooted in a single issue. Racism plays a part in this, of course, but it's minor when compared to other factors like stereotyping and stigma (both of which are not necessarily linked to race).

As for looking "beyond official accounts", I'm afraid you'll have to clarify. I generally try to find multiple sources that often times disagree with each other and draw my conclusions from the common points referred in them (That's why I try finding footage of the incidents that include a few seconds before it actually happens. Context is key in these situations).

@kasmian Hello again. Every mother of a black person I know, and in all the social media circles I participate in, understand all too well the consequences that a black person faces when dealing with police, or anyone in authority, They all drill into their children’s heads to never confront the police, and to comply with their orders. That didn’t save the life of Jordan Edwards, who was not confronted by the police. That did not save a life of Philando Castile. His girlfriend was in the driver seat and her live feed of the event didn’t start until after the cop shot. Her account and Officer Yanez’ account are not too dissimilar. Yanez asked Castile for his wallet. He was not the driver, but he was profiled by Officer Yanez. In compliance with regulations of owners of licenses to carry concealed weapons, Castile told the officer that he was licensed to carry and had a firearm in the vehicle. When he reached over to get his wallet, in compliance with the cops orders, the cop panicked and shot him to death.

Let me tell you the story of a young man in my neighborhood in an upscale suburban Atlanta neighborhood with a private lake in Kansas. This young man, who sports a large Afro, went down to the lake with a net to catch a frog for a science project. As soon as he stepped onto the grounds two men walked out of a home and said to him, “you don’t belong here”. He said yes sir turned and walked away. He was lucky he didn’t get shot. The same young man drives to and from school and work and he’s been pulled over by the cops multiple times. In none of these occurrences, has he violated the law. His car has been inspected, all brake lights and headlights working, there were no reasons for him to ever be pulled over, let alone multiple times. Each time he nervously complied with officers commands, and each time was let go without any violations being cited, without even a rationale being offered for why he was being pulled over. He’s been lucky to not get arrested. The ex swat team guy in the video, who claims that compliance with police officers commands will save a black person‘s life, has been proven wrong time again with real life events hat show that to not be the case. Compliance is not the solution. Compliance is a way to keep black people in fear of authority, of police. There are numerous documented instances where black people in compliance have been shot. So, one solution, be in compliance. No help to Castile. To Edwards. Another solution, hold cops accountable. But that’s after the fact, too late for the victims, but at least gives some measure of justice and acts as a deterrent against other acts of violence against black people. Now, do you want to see the rates of arrest of black people versus white people in America? Do you want to see the rates of incarceration of black people versus white people in America? What will it take for you to see that there is a systemic problem, to understand that police are indeed huge problem, not the fact of being born black.

@Bobbyzen I'll start my reply be stating something I've already stated several times in this discussion since you appear to be ignoring what I'm saying on this matter: I'M NOT DISAGREEING THAT THERE'S A PROBLEM, I'M DISAGREEING WITH YOUR METHODS OF PREVENTING IT. In fact, if you read a comment I made in this post you'll see I specifically blame the higher up for the incident here, not the victim and not the cop who was fired. I would thank you if you stopped making strawmen of my positions and actually argued my points instead of blaming me for things I didn't do.

That out of the way, I'll get to your arguments:
I empathize with families that lost loved ones to shootings, but that's a symptom of the actual problem, not the cause. Therefore, alleviating the symptom helps said families, but your claim that it fixes the problem is plain wrong.
The fact that compliance with police orders doesn't help is plain false. You need only to examine footage from these incidents and learn about basic police training to realize this. Talking with people from these marginalized groups gives you no insight of what police expect of them. Lack of compliance gets you killed, regardless of your skin color. If you doubt me, next time you're pulled over get out of your car with your hand in your pocket and walk toward the officer and you'll see how they react.
When cops shoot compliant people it's not always racist. You said it yourself, in the Castile case, the cop panicked and that resulted in the shooting. Again, if you learn about basic police training, you learn that, as a cop, must keep the suspect's hands visible at all times, more so if you suspect the presence of a weapon. The cop shot instead of issuing orders and he got punished for it.
If indeed your story's true, 1. the man wasn't shot or charged, not because of luck, but because, as you said, he was innocent and compliant. 2. if he was indeed constantly pulled over for no reason, he had grounds to take these cops to court and sue the living hell out of them 3. I'd ask you if you'd ever seen his driving habits to make sure he wasn't committing an honest mistake, something most cops usually ignore.
Lastly, your solutions feed into the problem: non-compliance will give racist cops a reason to justify shooting in court and give good cops a reason to shoot you in the first place, regardless of your skin color. Not calling the cops in the first place not only puts you in danger if your concerns are valid but also takes away any repercussions for criminals who are black and, thus, by your own logic, feeds the stereotype that you claim cops are guilty of, making more racist and dangerous cops, not less.

My solution, as you so graciously ignored and/or strawmaned, would be to work with police and citizens alike, create better relations between citizens and cops, educate people on what not to do and, for the love of all that's worth in life, stop fearmongering about cops. If you make a black man so fearful of police that he will refuse to cooperate, panic and attack them in a minor arrest, you're responsible for that man's eventual shooting.

@kasmian this is circular: I ask white people to stop calling cops on black people because compliant or not, criminal or not, they get shot. Period. I’m done. Out.

@Bobbyzen I'll take my leave as well since you haven't addressed my arguments. Regardless, I bear no ill will towards you and I do hope your methods work, even if I believe otherwise.

3

That seems like a pretty low settlement. I wonder if they're going to be under scrutiny from the feds. I think this guy should be the rule, not the exception. It sounds like the guy who was killed wanted the cops to shoot him, i.e. suicide by cop.

2

Bloody gun happy.

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