16 9

The popular DNA ancestry kits/results aren't supported by the science.

"CBC Marketplace investigates the science and marketing behind popular DNA ancestry kits. Host Charlsie Agro and her identical twin sister Carly test five top brands. Find out why ancestry test kits are not as accurate as you might think."

By VictoriaNotes
Options Favorite Like

Enjoy being online again!

Welcome to the community of good people who base their values on evidence and appreciate civil discourse - the social network you will enjoy.

Create your free account

16 comments

1

I just don't see myself spending that much just to know what my mix is. I am happier just fantasizing about it or just going on what we know about our family tree. Im also afraid of privacy breaches.

Janiesuper Level 5 Feb 17, 2019
Reply
2

I took the ancestry DNA test like a year ago, I was Supposedly 54% German and about 27% Irish (the Irish was a huge surprise) and 2-5% of this and that from several small areas close to those two. After about 6 months I got an E-mail from ancestry saying that due to recent advances in "the science" they
"re-evaluated" my profile, and I was now 51% German and 30% western european 2-5% Bla bla bla.....so I take it all with a grain of salt 🤷♂️

IIHEATHENII Level 4 Feb 16, 2019
Reply
2

Fun!
I'm from the Netherlands and as can be expected from a line of people that had to struggle to come around. Day-laborers or serving the rich in one or another way. Just like most people did. 1% enjoys, 99% struggles. That's all that counts for me. I would be interested in a kind of a social DNA, based on income, social status, and living circumstances.

Gert Level 7 Feb 13, 2019
Reply
2

Here are my DNA results from ancestry.com...

SleeplessInTexas Level 7 Feb 12, 2019
Reply
1

I tested on two sites in order to find family since my mother was adopted.

I have been quite successful in finding relatives I did not know about despite not finding the two people I am seeking. Yet.

Lucy_Fehr Level 7 Feb 11, 2019
Reply
1

I know many people who have spent money on such test and told me they are such and such % "viking", "Jewish", or " English". I gently as possible tell them that such notions are cultural and not natural categories, and the genes do not have nationalities.

chazwin Level 4 Feb 10, 2019
Reply
1

What's the saying, "trust but verify". If the science is not there where's the verification. My family has gotten into this but, for me, what's the point? Thank you again for your valid, skeptics report!

JackPedigo Level 8 Feb 10, 2019
Reply

Thank you, Jack.

1

I always liked Marketplace... Mostly good CBC reporting.
There are strict laws in Canada about access to personal information and these companies will be scrutinized severly if there were breached in some ways. That is not the case in the US.

Lukian Level 8 Feb 10, 2019
Reply

Well, clearly, your country is more evolved than ours in many ways.

2

What's even weirder to me is why someone would pay to have DNA tested for their dog from the shelter.

CrazyQuilter Level 7 Feb 10, 2019
Reply
2

Thank you.

skado Level 8 Feb 10, 2019
Reply
1

There is be made!

firjam Level 3 Feb 10, 2019
Reply
3

Science is sound, but methodology is unregulated. Poor application and quality control.

t1nick Level 7 Feb 9, 2019
Reply
2

Everybody's DNA ancestry winds up in Africa, eventually. What more do you need to know?

These companies are capitalizing on our more rootless culture, in a time when families have split up and spread across the country and sometimes around the world, as opposed to decades ago when several generations of an extended family might live in the same town and have family history and lore at their fingertips. They also (in their ads) appeal those who want to "trace" their DNA back across the ocean to families broken up by the slave trade. Since DNA has at best a tenuous connection to national origin, all this strikes me as promising much more than they can deliver.

Paul4747 Level 7 Feb 9, 2019
Reply

"all this strikes me as promising much more than they can deliver."

Absolutely, Paul. The video expounds on that.

2

Oh good...my results indicated I was far more white European than I thought I was!!

JeffMLambert Level 4 Feb 9, 2019
Reply
2

So it's 21st Century palm reading. smile007.gif

josh_is_exciting Level 7 Feb 9, 2019
Reply

Haha -- exactly.

2

I'm trying to figure out why people even want them. What would it really tell you about your ancestry if anything? If you are encouraged to do DNA and then store or keep it in some database you can rest assured that the authorities will have your DNA. This is probably what it is really all about. Otherwise it's just companies wanting to make money.

DenoPenno Level 8 Feb 9, 2019
Reply
  1. The results are often inaccurate.
  2. Commercial DNA databases are vulnerable to hacks.
  3. Your genetic information could be sold to the highest bidder
  4. Your genetic information is not anonymous.
  5. Your genetic data can be used against you

[investors.com]

@VictoriaNotes need a diydna doer.

@VictoriaNotes That's 5 good reasons not to be involved in this.

@DenoPenno Indeed.

@hankster dontcha

@btroje not sure, but I don't think so.

I did it to find relatives since adoption created a big gaping hole in my family.

I have found several 1st cousins and numerous seconds

I find the ethnicity part interesting but it was not why I did it.

Write Comment
Agnostic does not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content read full disclaimer
  • Agnostic.com is the largest non-profit community for atheists, agnostics, humanists, freethinkers, skeptics and others happy without religion!