Agnostic.com

16 3

I have always wondered why people have that need of belonging to a group, of following a leader, of becoming fanatics of something. I remember watching an atheist documentary which explained it very well but don't remember the title. Any ideas?

Alkimia 4 Mar 11

Post a comment Reply Add Photo

Enjoy being online again!

Welcome to the community of good people who base their values on evidence and appreciate civil discourse - the social network you will enjoy.

Create your free account

16 comments

Feel free to reply to any comment by clicking the "Reply" button.

0

There are two types of animal: those who are born and just go off already knowing all there is for their lives, and those that rely on a parent. The ones that typically grow up in a family unit are almost always going to seek a family unit to belong to later. Humans are no different.

0

We are a pack animal. It's as simple as that

0

Most mammals not all seem to have a symbolic relationship the young rely on the adults for protection and nourishment, even adults animals share meals and groom each other along with other privileges. We are just another member of the mammals.

0

Man used to live in small enlarged family groups like chimps or gorilla so its natural unlike our hugely populated cities.

0

Because humans are herd animals.

0

I've wondered the same thing myself.Belonging to a church is a prime example of this,although we all do it in one way or another.Please let us know if anyone comes up with name of the documentary.

0

It’s a fundamental you need to belong. We’re basically pack animals.

1

Here is a good source for looking: [documentaryheaven.com]

0

The huyman being is a social creature. We define ourselves largely through our interactions with others, We all feel some need to belong, to b accepted. Carried to an extreme, that can make us almost completely dependent on what others say and do -- or tell us to do To some degree, we need to establish our own independence of thought and action so that we are free to define ourselves.

0

Can we say that interaction is an aspect of evolution?

But I don't have a clue on what that documentary would be.

0

I was never in a group in high school. I tried the local atheist group, it didn't work out, thanks to one male atheist. The workout group on FB for atheists wasn't helping me. The Admin told me I'm skinny because of my depression. That wasn't true. I don't belong in the "coterie of gossip" at work. I don't want to be. Cliches are not my thing. I'm in this group only. It's more of a community to me though.

1

People. Social animals. We will always seek belonging. Isolation literally drives us insane and to an early death. Survival dictates (and this is hardwired) a need to belong.

0

Humans have evolved to be social animals. That is usually a positive thing, but it can be a problem on occasion.

0

LOL at first I thought you were talking about our need to belong to this group. I think i've found a couple of those already. But I promise I'll not reference those anymore.

No, I wasn't talking about this group. I'm talking about religion, sports, nationalism, family... I know it's an evolutive trait because individuals left alone would be easier prey or die of illness but what purpose does it serve today, at least in the US? In other countries it have allowed for social changes benefiting the population but here it only creates division. I watched this documentary which explained it so much better. I just can't remember the tittle. I tried watching the BBC show Brief History of Disbelief but that wasn't it. 😟

2

Its because we are social animals. Cities, villages etc. are based on this principle. Everyone around you has been conditioned to be social and your very environment is predicate on this.

1

I am not familiar with the documentary but I am very interested in it.

I hope someone manages to remember the correct title.

Write Comment
You can include a link to this post in your posts and comments by including the text q:35518
Agnostic does not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content. Read full disclaimer.