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Are you teaching your children that Santa Claus/Easter Bunny/Tooth Fairy are real?

I feel that it's lying to them. Their dads are asking that I give them the innocence while they're young

WineTurbine 4 Jan 11

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12 comments

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Imagination is great for development and my daughter was fed the myths of Santa and the tooth fairy.
When she started to question we helped her to set up experiments so she could work out whether or not santa and the tooth fairy were real.

We can all enjoy myths and fantasy and ghost stories, but as long as we have been taught the tools to separate fact from fiction, then I see no problems with it.

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Nope. As they're growing up, I want them to know that when I tell them something, it's true (to the best of my knowledge).

My 6 year old believed me that Santa is just pretend, until he came home from school last month and said that Santa really was real because his teacher said so and all the other kids thought he was real... ugh. Thanks, teacher.

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My daughter is a bit old for all of that but I probably could have gotten away with Santa for a few years. I'm not so opposed to Santa because at least he shows up every year. I'd prefer Santa over Jesus...when the hell is he coming

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The disposition of a mythical creature like Santa give kids hope not that. I agree with hope it is one of the darkest feeling when hope fails a type of remorse comes in and make you feel spite. That being said giving children a goal like waiting for Santa to bring christmas gifts is positive. Setting goals and achieving that goal is rewarding.

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I taught them how to think not what to think. honesty and openness are the best way.

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I don't see the harm in it. It's fun and exciting when you're young. These myths have lots of life lessons that can be carried to adulthood. When my 2 oldest children asked me if Santa was real or not, I never lied to them. I was honest and explained that Santa was not real and why it's fun to have imagination. Neither were mad or upset with me and it also answered any questions they had about the Easter bunny or tooth fairy at the same time. We still pretend because I have a 5 year old daughter who loves all that stuff. When the time comes for her to start asking questions, I'm sure she'll be more devastated that unicorns aren't real.

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These childhood myths are so ubiquitous that we allowed our children to participate. Within each is a spirit of giving that helps to teach altruism. When our children expressed doubts as they grew older, we explained the meaning of unselfish giving and unconditional love behind each concert. They got it and today practice these virtues. They also figured out the god myth as well and have healthy agnostic viewpoints too.

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Maybe...

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I'll side with the dads. Though I have no kids I've had nieces and nephews and classes of them. Let their fantasies run wild...reality will slap them in their little faces soon enough.

I've taken on the guises of so many creatures and personas I really can't remember them all. From hanging napkins over my ears to be a bunny at a "who's Alice?" tea party to fully costumed acts to stir the imagination in us all...

At some time each truth is found and the myth becomes entertainment...for some of us, anyway!

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Sorta but he also gets Krampus

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As real as anything else these days! I have no kids so no legit answer here. Seems like you could engage their sense of magic and wonder with things in the real world: the beauty of nature in animals and geodes, the infinity of space, the variety of human bodies and cultures.

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I did. My kids are young adults now. I grew up believing in Santa and the Easter bunny, as did their dad, and we regarded it as a simple fasntasy/rite of passage.

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