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Does anyone get a high from learning?

I've long known this but never thought to bring it up with anyone. I had occasion to take a mild opiod and found that it compares to feeling I get when I learn something new, most particularly the sensation I get when I begin reading a stimulating work of nonfiction. Does this happen to anyone else? Might this be the reason for my love of learning, lol? Am I literally addicted to knowledge? I've joked in the past about being hooked on bookdust....

BookDeath 8 Feb 17
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19 comments

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0

Nope. drugs.... yeah. Love... Yeah. Sex... yeah. learning... a new responsibility.

1

I do. I enjoy picking up new skills, reading history books and I prefer watching documentaries over reality shows.

1

We continuously learn something new if we're open to it. I learned today that there are 17 billion cells in our brain that act as instantaneous computers. I also learn almost daily how those who made our history lied to us, and I am always amazed to hear so many don't want their long-held views questioned.

They call it a type of PC. It is very similar to the ones who smugly announce they haven't opened a book since they left school. Without curiosity, without that spark, questioning and coming to our own decisions, how are we alive?

1

I feel euphoric at times if ive made a significant accomplishment

1

I often enjoy learning some new fact or gaining a fresh insight. Learning can certainly be a satisfying experience. I've never felt quite the way you described though. I once felt a sense of peace and calm just thinking how good it was that the universe exists, and how terrible it would be if no living things, no planets, no stars existed.

1

I do, especially if I learn something new on my latest cell phone.

2

Yes is the short answer, I love finding out new things and genuinely get a buzz out of it. I'm sure it drives my co-workers mad with my latest bit of trivial, but stunningly interesting, information.

2

I used to. I loved knowledge and lapped it up like a thirsty drink of cold water. But now I'm in a different stage of my life; for the first time, I do not care to work my brain that hard. It's too much hassle for me now. I still learn about specific things that catch my interest, but it has to be interesting, and even then I won't go to too much trouble. I have other priorities now.

marga Level 7 Feb 18, 2018
3

I believe learning, is a high in itself.

2

I don't know about learning as a broad concept, but I have a physical reaction if I am unable to read something each day. I have several ebooks on my kindle, and I have been taking classes of some sort for most of my life.

When I hear someone confidently spout what I know is ignorance, I cringe. I once made a comment about something only to be challenged about where I heard that. When I mentioned in a class, the person laughed and told me books aren't worth the paper they're printed on. She went on to say her husband or her pastor would tell her what she needed to know.

I know my mouth dropped open. I know I looked around at the other people that were looking down or away from me. I had no idea of what to say next as she was very abrasive and had no filters.

2

I've always loved learning. Kids who didn't irritated me. And bad teachers did, too.Growing is fun. And going forward, being able to help yourself and others is great. If too many of us stagnate--not helped by religion--we die and are taken over by the smarter ones.

4

Yes, particularly when it is directly applicable to our existence. For example, when watching the original Cosmos series, I learned from Carl Sagan, and later reprised by Neil deGrasse Tyson, that we are all comprised of star stuff--that a star exploded to produce the atoms in our bodies--that gave me chills.

2

I think I qualify, although I think to some extent novelty is a factor, because I tend to lose the sensation fairly quickly--unless the entire subject is fascinating and easily grasped by me.

I've found myself jumping into new topics of study with both feet and going full steam for a little while before losing interest and moving onto something else. I'm a horrible dilettante. :T

2

totally , I feel great the next day when i know I've added a bow to my quiver

1

It is a fantastic high when I achieve a sudden breakthrough in thought and a number of things I had learned or thought about earlier click into place!

1

I hated school as it was force-fed by people who frankly didn't give a shit about anyone apart from the top 10% and being dyslexic with terrible writing and spelling automatically took me out of the 10%. I do love to learn and be proven wrong especially now I can choose what to learn.

Just think of the toddler's face the first time he walks and doesn't fall down, or throws a ball that comes back to him.....

you lost me sorry?

1

I think I get something similar because I went to a free school and learned to learn for myself, and there was this real buzz about 'getting it' The problem was that I never wanted to learn maths or geography and sometimes (at 70 y.o) I am faced with just how ignorant I really am in these matters I am not stupid about money but need lots of change. I was called 'the book worm' by my family as I always had my nose in a book. I cope with my lack of understanding about where I am by enjoying being lost -At Glastonbury festival its a hoot its like a small city and at some point you do meet people you know who point you in the direction you should be heading .

1

Yes.

Gohan Level 7 Feb 17, 2018
1

Are you referring to " The eureka effect (also known as the Aha! moment or eureka moment) refers to the common human experience of suddenly understanding a previously incomprehensible problem or concept."

Look up the discovery of Archimedes and the displacement of water from his bath.

Any science discovery has the potential to give you a eureka moment and one of the tests to say that you have made a real science discovery is that your result in an investigation should be a real surprise. It should be pleasurable because you have strained your mind to find the connection to the answer and you were not expecting it!!

No, though I'm familiar with "the eureka effect," I'm referring more to a longer-lasting emotional state.

Yes, and the wow you get when released from the tether of theism.

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