Agnostic.com

54 22

Questions:

Do you take offense at turns of phrase, such as....

"Bless your heart" (in the sense that a person feels bad about something you're dealing with, not the sense that they are calling you dumb)

"Good lord! (In a fit of frustration)

"Jesus fucking christ!" (Frustration, naturally)

"Oh my god." (In the throws of passion... or frustration.... take your pick)

"Bless you." (when someone sneezes)

I think it's interesting when atheists take offense at turns of phrase. I cannot relate. I have no interest in changing someone's vernacular. Acceptance of people's quirks, makes for a much easier and satisfying life. Their turns of phrase have no bearing on me. To each their own. Most especially in a relationship with a fellow atheist. They are just turns of phrase that became common place, as leftovers from former religious adherence as a child, no doubt. Feeling the need to criticize your partner, and be critical of it, seems extreme. The phrases do not imply belief in the magic fairy in the sky.

By nutrition_nerd7
Actions Follow Post Like

Post a comment Add Source Add Photo

Enjoy being online again!

Welcome to the community of good people who base their values on evidence and appreciate civil discourse - the social network you will enjoy.

Create your free account

54 comments

Feel free to reply to any comment by clicking the "Reply" button.

7

I still say some of those things. Not because I believe but more out of habit. I do say “bless your heart” but as a “your dumb” type of way. My favorite is “god fucking damnit!”

I can’t stand when someone says “have a blessed day” though. Had a nurse leave an appoint reminder message and closed with “have a blessed day”. My first thought was “how unprofessional”. I guess I’m a religious word snob. Some is acceptable but some infringes on my personal views and how dare anyone force their religious blessings on me.

I still say some of those things too out of habit. But I think when I do, I'm contributing to the perpetuation of religious myth. These common phrases show how Christianity co-opts everything!

I think I should instead say, "Oh my Zeus!" or "Thank you, Flying Spaghetti Monster!"

P.S. I love your handle, Helion. Very witty! smile002.gif

7

I say jesus fucking christ when i drive. A lot. Loudly. : /

exactly! smile001.gif

7

Life is too short to be offended by such trivial things.

6

Personally I think there are far more important things.. I make an effort not to slip into that but it doesn't bother me at all.. It has no meaning for most people..

To be angered by it is like being angered by having to breathe .. It's pointless.

Nickbeee Level 8 May 2, 2018

To be angered by it is like being angered by having to breathe .. It's pointless

That is so brilliant I am going to use this Thanks bro

6

I have no control over the actions of others.
I only have control over my actions.

Gnarloc Level 7 May 1, 2018

@nutrition_nerd more than that. Why take umbrage when someone wishes you well? No matter the words used?

6

they are just making a polite (to them) noise. I just blow it off.

6

I am guilty of saying some of these. We went to pick up pizza for dinner this evening and the lady at the restaurant told us to "have a blessed day." If I were offended by it I would spend the majority of my time offended. It isn't worth it.

6

I occasionally voice, "Jesus Fucking Christ," and "Goddamn," but use secular profanity a lot more.

JimG Level 8 May 1, 2018
5

Of course I'm not offended by those phrases. It's foolish to be. If people really believe in god and they mean good things to me, I'm thankful. If they're non believers and use those phrases because they're part of vernacular language, that's good too

Tetla Level 2 May 2, 2018

@nutrition_nerd Thanks - sometimes I do !! :0 smile009.gif other times I wonder lol !

5

I try to take things in the context they are intended, and I don't look for offense. Life is too darn short.

5

No

Eray Level 3 May 1, 2018
5

Take offense is too strong wording but I do notice.

One you didn't mention is Special. I was told of a bumper sticker that was apparently popular at BYU -- I'd rather be dead than Special.
I do notice such things a little. I have to admit.

RichCC Level 7 May 1, 2018
5

I use some of these (or variations, like Jesus H Tits) myself. I have taken to saying the less metaphysical Gesudheit when someone sneezes, but it doesn't offend me in the least. And here in NC, "bless your heart" almost never has a sympathetic meaning.

zeuser Level 8 May 1, 2018
5

Where i live, if I took offense to phrases like those, I'd be offended all the damn time. smile001.gif

Deb57 Level 8 May 1, 2018

Isn't that the truth.

4

I just roll with it.

"Bless his/her heart" is a Southern way of softening the blow. While gossiping, it's an attempt to make them seem charitable. After harshly criticizing an absent person, Southerners qualify it:

"Sam is a lying snake who can't keep it in his pants, bless his heart."

4

Now the only problem I ever have with "Bless your heart"..Being from the south that often means "Wow what a dumb ass" Other than that I don't see it as a biggy.

4

HOLY SHIT!!!!!!!

nvrnuff Level 8 May 2, 2018
4

It doesn't bother me at all when others use religious phrases...

DGJ0114 Level 7 May 1, 2018
3

A lot of those bless you type phrases have been around way longer than christianity, so no, I'm not offended. If someone wishes me well, no matter how it's said, I'm generally ok with it.

3

I think that people forget that language constantly evolves to have different meanings which are different from those of us all over the world .I imagine that Linguists have a hard time tracking where we are at - For me its like how cockney rhyming slang evolved for street traders to evade the Police. They made their own sometimes daily evolving language so if someone is not a cockney barrow boy it is very hard to make out what is being said. If a non cockney worked out a word or two it wouldn't make sense. I imagine everyone knows "lets have a butcher's' Butchers hook ='look'- lets have a look ! So you need the second part of the rhyme to get it - so - you don't get it . Old street slang plus new permeates our language as well as new words for new things that come into being like robots. its a good thing I htink that language is evolving because that means to me that we are too.

jacpod Level 8 May 2, 2018
3

The only time I take offense of a blessing or a curse, is if they are meant to be offensive to me personally.

3

Doesn't bug me. What bakes my biscuit a bit, here in Prosper, TX the cars that city employees drive have, in god we trust on them. That bugs me, but I don't have the resources or the time to fight something like that, even though it's been proven to be illegal . When someone says something like I'll pray for you. I'll say something to the effect of I'll think for you. I do it with a smile on my face.

Willreef Level 6 May 2, 2018
3

it would be hard to have a conversation with anyone around here without running into that. so no I don't find it offensive. I do find some things awkward tho. The old "praying for you" or "they're in a better place now" and all that kind of stuff is weird. I do understand though that this world is not all about me.

hankster Level 9 May 2, 2018
3

Not offended. They are just phrases. Grew up saying "bless you" after sneezes and still do. I say J F C more than I'd like to admit, but only when I'm super frustrated.

kltuckmn Level 7 May 2, 2018
3

No, for me they all have become figures of speech, or just exclamations that carry no weight or meaning. Sort of like if I would say "Blimey" or "Shit"

Write Comment
You can include a link to this post in your posts and comments by including the text 'q:71327'.
Agnostic does not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content read full disclaimer.
  • Agnostic.com is a non-profit community for atheists, agnostics, humanists, freethinkers, skeptics and others!