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Do you say the pledge of allegiance, when called to do so in a public setting? If so, do you include the words "...under god?" If not, do you stand or do you remain seated if you are already seated? I myself stand and pledge my allegiance because I want folks to know that I--a liberal, agnostic, Democrat--am invested in making this country as good as it can be, but I don't say "under God."

GarytheGondolier 6 Aug 24
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97 comments (26 - 50)

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3

I say it every day at school as a teacher. I say "under god" just because I don't want a disruption of questions at the beginning of every period ("Why didn't you say that, Mr. X" ), and the closest I've come to being "out" as an atheist is to say I am not religious. I have too many headaches in getting my job done as at is.

Many students don't know many of the words in the pledge anyway. Pledge? Allegiance? Republic? Indivisible? Liberty? I can tell you I've had many students over the years who didn't know what any of those words meant.

3

I would do the same thing, I would stand, but not say the under god word, I would say that I'm proud of my country and America, but never use any god or religious words in it.

3

when i was a junior in high school i said the pledge but left out "under god." as a senior i didn't even stand, because the "one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all" was so obviously also not true. it was something i wished was true, but it wasn't. i took hell for it, too, but i wouldn't stand. now i realize that loyalty oaths are dangerous to begin with, and that if someone was in fact a traitor to the country, wouldn't that person be the first to jump to his/her feet and the loudest reciter of the pledge? and furthermore, how often do we have to say it? does it expire? i don't need to show anyone anything. i am who i am. i love my country and i am invested in its not being the kind of country that persecutes people, even for not reciting a loyalty oath.

g

3

I never say the pledge nor put my had over my heart. I think it another form of worship.

2

I always take a deep breath and skip the under God part.

2

I am English and when in Dallas once went to an ice hockey match. It was about two months after 9-11 and the New York Fire Brigade choir or sumsuch sang the Star Spangled Banner. I think the match was Dallas someone v NewYork someone else.

The gist is that I found myself getting caught up with the whole emotion of the event and has my hand on my heart singing.

Shows how the collective can affect you when you are off guard!

2

I say dog

2

I stand out of deference/respect for others' wishing to make loyalty Tantamount to a symbolic ritual. That is it. I choose not to participate in rituals as a free person and offer no apologies or explanations.

2

I say it the way it was originally written. Under god was added in the 50's, I believe.

2

I stand for the pledge of allegiance (although have not been called upon to have a reason to do so recently), with my hand over my heart, but I simply omit the "under god" words. That is what I taught my three children to do at school. They were never questioned about it, I doubt anyone ever notices if those words are not spoken!

2

I stand and face the flag
Remove the hat. Stand quietly, as is my right.

2

I leave out under god.

2

I skip the Under God part I just take a breath. if anyone notices, they don't say anything.

2

I will stand but the old version is what I recite.

BillF Level 7 Aug 25, 2019

Yes, and written by a "socialist" to prove his patriotism.

2

It's your choice freedom of religion is also freedom from religion do as you please

bobwjr Level 10 Aug 25, 2019
2

I most do NOT as it has been deemed unconstitutional to force such nonsense on people the orignal version is all you need say..

2

I typically don’t, but I could imagine saying the old version as the “under god” line was only implemented during the cold war

2

I salute in honor of my father who served in WWII and received two Bronze Stars. I stand and omit "under god."

2

I believe that WE are God. So I pledge allegiance to us. Mankind. We are the whole ball of wax. Vietnam taught me this.

2

We don't have any equivalent to your Pledge and I would be really embarrassed if we did. I abhor all national anthems and for many years now I have made a point of never standing up for them. Australia has disgraced itself by importing many jingoistic customs (flags on cars or in front yards etc) and I despise them.

Senex Level 5 Aug 24, 2019
2

I do say the pledge but don't say the words "under god". I don't care if anyone else sits during it, etc. I like how patriotic I feel in the moment...not saying the "under god" part makes me feel grateful I live in a country that I won't get killed for not saying it.

2

Under god wasn't added until 1954, so it's ok if you don't say it. [ushistory.org]

2

I like the 1923 version: "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

2

Yes I say the pledge of allegiance. Yes I say “under god”. Though I can’t think of the last time I was prompted to do so since high school. Do people really waste time thinking about this stuff?

I am asked to repeat the pledge of allegiance at every meeting of my local Democratic club.

@GarytheGondolier Well that club seems like an even bigger waste of time. I guess that’s why I’ve never been in something like that. It takes all kinds though. I’m sure my activities would seem equally a waste of time to you.

2

I simply stand with my hand over my heart but speak not a syllable much as I do when a prayer is called at a public event. Google an image of the “Bellamy Salute” that was endemic in the early 20th Century.

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