Agnostic.com
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Married 38 years, father of two, business owner, amateur astronomer, engineer, veteran, analyst, school teacher, native Californian.

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Utopia?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 22, 2018:
Assuming this lifestyle is desired, what kind of societal engineering would it take to make the single-income homeowner with a pension a reality? What would need to occur in order to really ‘make America great again’ not for whites only, but for all?
What happens after deaths accordingly to you. Is the soul thing is true or myth. How do you define ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 22, 2018:
If there is a realm of existence beyond bodily death, it would be a purely natural production and not the result of some supernatural deity. There are some who accept the theory of evolution while at the same time believing in the existence of a soul that continues in the afterlife. To these ‘troubled souls’ I would ask, when in our evolutionary development did this condition arise? Did early hominids have souls? Is Lucy’s still out there, having roamed the African plain for the past 3 million years? Were there early crude, undeveloped or vestigial souls that, like George Carlin’s ‘Frisbeetarians’ whose souls get stuck on the roof, didn’t quite make it to immortality? What about other animals? The entire soul idea can be a huge time waster—a distraction from what should be our primary focus: the present, and this one life we have.
I find it difficult to remain friends with someone who is intellectually dishonest. I have a buddy ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 22, 2018:
How is this behavior intellectually dishonest? Sounds more like the admissions of a true believer to me!
I just took a look at Mars and it seems that the planet wide dust storm is still raging. There were ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 22, 2018:
I've seen it too ... a fuzzy red blob! Poor Mark Watney! ;-)
Five Foundations of Morality in America (Jonathan Haidt) When you decide whether something is ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 22, 2018:
I have Jonathan Haidt’s book, 'The Righteous Mind,' which I’ve marked up extensively, and I’ve watched most of his YouTube videos, including his TedTalks. To help clarify, the elements of Haidt’s moral matrix are as follows: - Harm/Care - Liberty/Oppression (found in The Righteous Mind, but not in his TedTalk) - Fairness/Reciprocity - Loyalty/Betrayal (or In-group/Loyalty) - Authority/Subversion (or Authority/Respect) - Sanctity/Degradation (or Sanctity/Purity) In 'The Righteous Mind,' Haidt states that Liberals most value elements 1, 2 and 3, while Libertarians are strong on 2 and 3 only, and Conservatives, as you indicated, value all 6. However, according to Haidt’s research (as presented in his TedTalk), these value differences are hardly unique to the US, and cross cultures and continents. The important question, in my opinion, relates not to the differences between Liberals, Libertarians and Conservatives, but whether or not the three unshared (i.e., Conservative) values are, in fact, legitimate moral imperatives. What, after all, may be universally judged to be moral about loyalty, authority and purity? I am not the first to assert that the foundation of all morality rests on two, and only two, pillars: Reciprocity and Empathy, the precursors of which may be observed in other primates. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SOQduoLgRw
A secular ideology that rests on the core value of personal freedom can be dangerous because it ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 21, 2018:
Since the dawn of Homo sapiens, our species has always been on the move. Even without a commitment to so-called 'secular ideology,' (whatever that means) it is in our nature to venture out, take risks, abandon comfort and to wander.
Quotes: "Collective commitment to the absurd is the greatest demonstration of group love that ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 21, 2018:
Reading these quotes immediately reminded me of the mass suicides of the besieged Zealots and Sicarii at Masada, as well as the Peoples Temple cult. Other than religion, what motivates such collective commitment behavior?
Human nature question around the "greater good". If you could save 1 life by dying yourself, would ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Absent any context, such a thought exercise is not possible to answer, in my opinion. One can never know how heroic or cowardly one would be until thrust into a situation where a life and death decision must be made.
Islamic Paradise -- virgins and slaves from Allah
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Pity the fool who came up with the 70 virgin bit as a definition of 'paradise.' Sounds more like hell to me! One experienced partner is more than enough to make me happy.
Many people are entertained by horror movies/stories. Can you help explain why people take an ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
One should make distinctions when discussing the genre of horror. There’s 'slash film' style horror, which focuses on violence; scary films which employ tactics designed to make you jump out of your seat; monster movies of many types; seductive horror, such as vampirism; and classic horror which may involve deeply disturbing human psychological elements, just to name a few. Personally, I’ve never been into slash films, and prefer the violence to be off-camera, or implied. But almost all of us have a need to be frightened by something—the popularity of roller coasters is evidence of this desire. Experiencing fear makes us feel 'alive.'
Judging Sinners ☺
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
The fabrication of the concept of "sin" by pious and arrogant religionists was a most sinful deed! ;-)
In what ways does this happen?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Religion teaches defective reasoning. Religion gives answers in the absence of, or contrary to, evidence, and demands that we believe, based on that toxic mixture of insanity and ignorance called faith. In this way, people are inured to mental laziness and choose to remain willfully ignorant in a community where it is dangerous to question, and sinful to doubt. It seems to me that stupidity, on the other hand, may have more to do with heredity than to a given belief system or mode of thinking. To quote the comedian Ron White, "You can't fix stupid." If one is born with a given intellectual capacity, he/she doesn’t grow up to ‘become stupid or mentally defective’ just by being raised in a church—at least that’s my personal experience. ;-)
Do you feel optimistic about the future??
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
I'm no Pangloss. I remain optimistic on the macro level, while fully aware that we are experiencing a 'disturbance in the force.' The pendulum will swing back ... sooner or later. I tend to believe that many years from now students of history will look at the late 10's much as an adult looks at his/her teenage years and wonders, 'what the hell was I thinking?'
What do you think of parents who home school their children? The question is about parents,not the ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
It depends on the parents. I had a male colleague who was a double-e and whose wife was a teacher. They decided to home school their son while she took a good number of years off. The boy was brilliant and musically gifted, as well as athletic, and well socialized--they attended church and he was an Eagle Scout. Their son finished high school at the age of sixteen, literally aced the SAT (perfect score) and was given a scholarship at Virginia Tech (engineering, of course). Kid turned out all right, thanks to good parenting.
What is your area of expertise??
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
I strive for polymathy.
God exists: so what
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Of course we don't. Do we demand that our children thank and praise us? Only if we're narcissistic. And to think that our inconsequential lives on a little pale blue dot in the middle of one of billions of galaxies occupies the interest of an entity capable of bringing the universe into existence represents the highest form of hubris ... which is essentially what religion gives you. Like many of his contemporaries, my avatar was a Deist. To the Deist, the Almighty made the universe, set up its laws, and moved on to other things--no interaction, no need for prayer, no miracles, no doctrines, no holy books or prophets, no churches and no organized religions. That's a God I could live with. Reminds me of the lyric by Todd Rundgren: God said... You are not serving me, you're serving something else Cause I don't need to be pleased, just get over yourself You can't suck up, up to me, I know you all too well But I don't dwell upon you, so get over yourself Cause you're not praying to me, you're praying to yourself And you're not worshipping me, you're worshipping yourself And you will kill in my name and heaven knows what else When you can't prove I exist, so get over yourself
[youtube.com] To all Tool/Maynard lovers he understood that we have only bodies holding us. ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Best band ever not to be found on streaming media!
No one ever stood in a rainbow. Did they?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Many times ... in my backyard sprinkler! ;-)
How do you make sense of this?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Your John the Baptist dream sounds like something out of Lord of the Rings ... are you sure you didn't meet Aragorn?
So, passed a bill where the IRS, can not investigate a church that has violated the 1st Amendment of...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Huh? What law? And what does the First Amendment have to do with donations? Please provide sources. This is what I found on the IRS website: Under the Internal Revenue Code, all section 501c(3) organizations are absolutely prohibited from directly or indirectly participating in, or intervening in, any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for elective public office. Contributions to political campaign funds or public statements of position (verbal or written) made on behalf of the organization in favor of or in opposition to any candidate for public office clearly violate the prohibition against political campaign activity. Violating this prohibition may result in denial or revocation of tax-exempt status and the imposition of certain excise taxes.
I have always admired Michael Jacksons' work. This is one that I have never heard. It's beautiful . ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 20, 2018:
Not only beautiful, inspirational. Thank you!
Isn't scientific knowledge and certainty synonymous with religious dogmas and their unquestioning ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Well, let's examine that. Science is both a body of knowledge and a process, or way of reasoning about the universe we inhabit. Science rests on the scientific method, which relies on observation, measurement and repeatability to demonstrate the validity of an hypothesis. The scientific method begins with falsifiable predictions—i.e., what observations, or data, would serve to disprove the hypothesis—and utilizes methodological naturalism when conducting its investigations. A scientific theory, such as gravity, relativity and evolution, represents the highest form of scientific knowledge, and provides causal explanations for observed phenomena, as well as predictions that can be tested. That said, science recognizes that all knowledge is provisional, and is always subject to refinement, revision and even replacement, as new information warrants. In other words, scientific authority comes from the information gathered, not scientists themselves. Like science, religion is both a body of information (or collected writings and doctrines) and a way of thinking about the universe, which in this case is based not on observation and measurement, but on faith. But unlike science, religion begins from a presupposed voice of authority—typically a special text or a self-proclaimed spokesperson. Religion then seeks to justify and explain its fundamentals, often via an elaborate superstructure of authoritative pretext. Religion never provides falsifiable predictions—it never asks, what fact or observation would serve to disprove a particular belief? Finally, religion views its knowledge as final, not open to reinvestigation or objective scrutiny. Its authority comes from a book or set of texts written by people whose testimony may never be questioned, as well as the self-proclaimed experts of interpretation, the clergy. We should all remember that nearly every religion has, as its foundation, a miracle—which is to say, a violation of the laws of nature … in other words, a lie. No miracle ever was performed, and no miracle can be performed, and until we are witness to the disruption in the steady chain of cause and effect by a power superior to nature, we may safely say that the fiction known as religion need not be seriously considered.
Are flat-earthers serious, or are they just trolling the rest of us?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
As one who spent a good portion of his career as a systems engineer and mission analyst in satellite operations and space launch for companies like Lockheed Martin and Raytheon, I find the very notion that someone could actually believe this shit to be absurd. I mean, seriously? Take me to the edge and show me your proof. But even if they're serious about it, they're still effectively trolls and have absolutely no place in reasoned discourse or a discussion room on the topic of Science. We have a word for one who exhibits a state of mind that is so disordered that it prevents normal perception, behavior, or social interaction--insane. As I recently reminded Kitarae, an apparent true believer in a flat earth, who claims to be "an intelligent, spirited, freethinker" and accused me of being 'closed minded' regarding the non-existence of NASA, the Hollywood conspiracy of the moon missions, and of course, a flat earth: 'Each is entitled to their own opinions, but not to their own facts.'
Largest Voting Machine Vendor in US Admits Its Systems Had Remote-Access Software Installed! ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Makes one long for the days of paper ballots and hanging chads.
What was your first reaction when you heard about the creation story, the fall of man and the ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
As a toddler, all Bible stories (which were told to us before we could remember) held equal sway. When you are first reminded, at the tender age of less than 3 years old, that the Bible is God's holy book, and to ever question it would be the worst thing you could possibly do, your mind is softened to accept whatever is in it. Sure, we can laugh about it now, but if you were not the product of a lifetime of brainwashing, it represents a high degree of insensitivity to question how any person could believe. Childhood victims of brainwashing have little choice in the matter. It usually takes maturity and a high degree of courage to commit apostasy.
Hilarious Clip - Christian Is Terrified By Logic Atheist Experience [youtu.be]
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
A primal scream in the face of irrepressible logic is about the same as uttering, "De do do do de da da da..."
Had anyone else seen this one ?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Agnostic, unbelieving, nullifidian (having no faith or religious belief) who would like nothing more than to see the death of all organized religions.
You can be patriotic and not have to pump your chest, yelling about how patriotic you are...right?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Not a chest pumper, but I served in uniform, swearing an oath to protect and defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic. Our Constitution's preamble begins boldly with "We the People," and was the first official state document that denied the existence of any God's divine right over the governed. But 'We the People' sometimes forget our responsibilities in ensuring the continued viability of the rights conferred therein. In my opinion, it is our patriotic duty as citizens to ensure that the rights extended in our Constitution apply to all, and are not impinged.
Queer Muslims Will Gather In Delhi For A Special Iftaar To Celebrate Their Faith And Identity - ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Note that this gathering is taking place in India where Muslims are a minority. When such a gathering is allowed in Riyadh or Tehran, that will be newsworthy!
Rudyard Kipling's 'If' poem scrubbed off wall by students who claim he was a 'racist'
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Dig deep enough and one will find a flaw in any artist. When judging flaws, one should always consider the context of the time and place in which the artist lived. Knowing as we do that morality evolves, we should take care not to misapply today's standards. The question comes down to the nature of the flaws and to how deeply connected the artist's work is to his/her flaws. Case in point, Richard Wagner's rabid antisemitism, which was well-understood during his career, and is why his music, well-known for having been appropriated by Hitler's Nazis, is seldom, if ever, played by Israeli symphonies.
Very first concert you attended?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
The Carpenters at Universal Studios in 1971. I was in junior high.
What are your thoughts about religious waivers for complying with public health or safety policies?...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Silly and foolish as there are helmets that accomodate Sikh headwear. Vaccinations must be required, with rare, genetic / health (i.e., nonreligious) exceptions, for the safety of the society as a whole. The 'all life is sacred' philosophy evidently doesn't include plant life? Finally, not all vaccinations are viral; some are bacterial. If a bacteria is deemed 'sacred' our immune system is conducting a holocaust.
Hope everyone is having a fantastic evening! Wrap my wings around the deep purple satin darkness of ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
Ooooh ... so scary!
Does aggressive antitheism beget anti-atheism?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
I do not view myself as an anti-theist, as I find it difficult to summon animosity toward something I don’t believe exists, much less may be defined. But as a nullifidian, I detest with every fiber of my being organized religion. Churchgoers are not the enemy, rather it is the doctrines, dogmas, values and assertions of their religions that are to be combated, at every turn. It is organized religion that has given us that unhappy mixture of ignorance and insanity called faith, and that seeks to turn credulity into a virtue. It is religion that poisons the mind of children by teaching them about invisible beings who will torture and punish them in fire for disobedience. And it is religion that seeks to influence secular government with its own set of policies and laws. Belief in a God, in and of itself, isn't a problem. My avatar, along with many of his fellow Revolutionaries, was a Deist who believed that the Almighty created the universe and the laws governing it, and then moved on to other pursuits. No divine interventions, no doctrines, no prophets, nobody to answer prayers, no creeds, no clergy, no so-called holy books, none of any of that. Consider a world without the following terms, made meaningless in the absence of religion: apostasy, apostle, atonement, baptism, blasphemy, canonize, clergy, conversion, crusade, curse, divine, eucharist, exorcism, faith, fundamentalism, gospel, hajj, heathen, heaven, hell, heresy, holy, infidel, jihad, laity, martyrdom, messianism, miracle, occult, prayer, profane, prophecy, prophet, proselytize, purgatory, resurrection, ritual sacrifice, sacred, salvation, scapegoat, scripture, shamanism, shrine, sin and worship. How much better off the world would be had these words and what they stand for never been introduced! Now that’s a world I would happily live in!
I have a fascination with fungi and quiet mountain trails.
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
I have a friend who lives near Pittsburgh who has a PhD in biochemistry and specializes in the pharmacology of fungi. When he told me of all the life-saving medicines produced by mushrooms, I was blown away. All we ever seem to hear about are the psychotropic and the poisonous. Lovely photography, by the way.
People call us skeptics and non-believers closed-minded. Have you ever changed your mind on ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 19, 2018:
I was very skeptical that the bar set by “W” during his eight years in office could not be lowered; that the man who gave us such gems as, "Rarely is the question asked: Is our children learning?" or "One of the great things about books is sometimes there are some fantastic pictures,” represented the intellectual nadir of the Presidency. I was proven wrong. And beyond that, I can now acknowledge what I refused to see, a mere 8-10 years ago. Namely, that the thread as presented in books like ‘The Age of American Unreason’ [2008] by Susan Jacoby and ‘Idiot America: How Stupidity Became a Virtue in the Land of the Free’ (2010) by Charles Pierce, connects with the Dunning-Kruger effect, and has helped create our present embarrassment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=29&v=wvVPdyYeaQU
I feel so pretty now!
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
Nice shirt ... but your post had me humming Bernstein! ;-)
Soooo true!
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
The thing's been around since 2001 ... built just to take the record from the 190 ft tall one in Groom, Texas ... bet it makes one hell of a lightning rod.
How many other people have started to study philosophy due to the show?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
Matt Dillahunty's preparation and rational objectivity led me to return to philosophy (only took one course in college), particularly the subject of epistemology--how we justify our beliefs.
Burden of Proof | John - Topeka, KS | Atheist Experience 21.18 [youtube.com]
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
Most believers have difficulty with this concept, and seem unable (or unwilling) to make the comparison with the legal system, whereby a defendant is found 'guilty' or 'not guilty,' but is never found 'innocent.' To the unbeliever who understands the argument, the burden of proof of God's existence has not been met--God is therefore found 'not guilty' of existing.
What are some of the biggest scientific breakthroughs??
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
In addition to those mentioned, the discovery of radiocarbon dating by Willard Libby; the discovery of the iridium rich K-Pg boundary by the team led by Luis Alvarez; and the inadvertent discovery by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson of the cosmic microwave background radiation left over from the Big Bang.
Given that assimilation and appropriation of external culture traits/features is a means through ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
Here's an entertaining look at 'cultural appropriation' from YouTuber T1J (the1janitor). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGgj9S8XO7k
What is Reality?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
It is my position that reality exists outside of our collective or individual abilities to perceive it. One only need ask, if another asteroid were to obliterate all sentient life on the planet, would not the reality of a universe, galaxy, solar system and the 3rd planet from the sun remain? Do the laws of the physical universe require human discovery to exist?
Anselm and the Argument for God: Crash Course Philosophy 9 - YouTube
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
Ah, the ontological argument ... one of William Lane Craig's favorites!
As a newcomer, I find Agnostics to be elitist. I'm not able to participate in chats or view people ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
This is my second go-around, and I still don’t get the whole ‘level’ thing … does seem a little pretentious. But to generalize agnostics as elitist is much the same thing as generalizing any group—unfair, offensive and just plain wrong. Dig a little deeper, won’t you?
Really happy to be visiting my birth city of Sydney Australia. So much easier to be an Atheist here,...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 18, 2018:
Speaking of atheists, thank you for the gift of Jim Jefferies. I long to visit the land where "beer does flow and men chunder" ... think I'll have a vegemite sandwich!
How many places have you lived in your lifetime?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 17, 2018:
Please define ‘place,’ and for that matter, ‘live.’ Do you consider a period of less than a year ‘living in a place?’ And is a ‘place’ a region, state, country, ZIP Code or a particular dwelling?
What are the best come-backs someone pushing flat earth science? I can't seem rid of these folks ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 17, 2018:
Wow! I’ve heard of flat earthers, but never met one. As a skeptic I’m inclined to believe that no one is really a flat earther, and that they’re only doing this for attention. How do they explain the navigational patterns of aircraft and ships transitting the oceans? They always use great arc circle navigation. Even though both cities are very close to the same latitude, a plane or ship leaving San Francisco headed for Tokyo never heads west, but always heads towards Alaska following the curvature of the earth to save time/fuel, thus proving that a straight line is never the shortest distance between two points on the sphere!
I never felt beliefs being “pushed” on me with regard to religion. I always just saw them as ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 17, 2018:
What about ‘imposed’ then? When religions successfully influence curricula, policies and laws, they are imposing their worldview on others. Abortion rights, access to alcoholic beverages, religious symbols on public property, public school science texts, prayers in public proceedings, the insertion of God on currency and in the Pledge to the flag, denials of service on so-called religious grounds, etc. are some of the many ways that religion imposes itself on society. These impositions are always seen as virtuous by the majority, even as they are ‘pushed’ upon the minority. Religions have generally been very pushy when it comes to their agenda.
I have a no soliciting sign by my door and just had a couple of theists knock on my door. I ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 17, 2018:
Here's a tactic you might want to try. Tell them they are welcome to come in and share their system of belief with you, as long as they're willing to give you equal time to explain why you are an atheist (or agnostic). I wonder how many takers you'd get? Then again, if you value your privacy and feel their very presence on your porch is an intrusion, just keep pointing to your sign--they are, after all, soliciting your valuable time!
"Religion is often depicted as a kind of virus, a mental disease or disorder, a scourge on humanity,...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 16, 2018:
While I appreciate Michael Shermer’s work, I respectfully disagree with the crux of his argument—namely, that one should not entertain notions of a world without religion, which may be viewed as comparable to a political system. Organized religion represents a scourge—a blight on society. And with their favorable tax benefits; their disproportionate influence on curricula, policies and laws; their unproven, unknowable and incompatible truth claims; their sometimes violent rivalries and internecine conflicts; and their hubris that pretends to speak for the so-called creator of the universe—these religions have no useful part in our future. Yahweh, Christ and Allah are destined to take their place alongside Ra, Zeus and Odin in the graveyard of the other dead religions. And while they may seem at times to be resurgent, the world’s great religions are gradually becoming irrelevant, even as they desperately grasp for renewed power through their hirelings and lackeys in the halls of government. But their doctrines, fables and wonders are ringing more hollow with each generation. As Robert Green Ingersoll observed, “Take from the church the miraculous, the supernatural, the incomprehensible, the unreasonable, the impossible, the unknowable, the absurd, and nothing but a vacuum remains.” “Every new religion has a little less superstition than the old, so that the religion of Science is but a question of time.”
What kind of philosophical school of thought do you adhere to in your daily lives??
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 16, 2018:
Positivism.
Everyone born atheist untill society starts to brain wash you.
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 16, 2018:
In every society, there are, and have been (and may continue to be), unbelievers who ‘suffer from' an experience that gives them faith. They hear a voice, receive a vision and experience something unique and life-altering. They become a prophet, and a religion is born. To this I can only offer the cold, hard, shatterproof logic of my avatar, who observed: “It is a contradiction in terms and ideas, to call anything a revelation that comes to us at second-hand, either verbally or in writing. Revelation is necessarily limited to the first communication; after this, it is only an account of something which that person says was a revelation made to him; and though he may find himself obliged to believe it, it cannot be incumbent on me to believe it in the same manner; for it was not a revelation made to me, and I have only his word for it that it was made to him.” Thomas Paine, The Age of Reason, 1794 Consider how different the world would be, particularly with regard to the existence of religion, if everyone discounted so-called revealed wisdom, whether in speech or text, and insisted only on first-person communication from a ‘supernatural’ entity. Absent our own burning bush, angel Gabriel or observed ascensions, we are obliged to disregard such fictions!
Damn, just when Mars is close enough that with a decent telescope we could see the boats on the ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 16, 2018:
Martian gondoliers have longer poles... so to speak.
DO ATHEISTS AND HUMANISTS HAVE SACRED VALUES? After I read the following lines written by Daniel ...
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 16, 2018:
As a secular skeptic I have difficulty with words like sacred, sacrosanct, sanctified, holy and the demeaning concept of the term, worship. In an ideal universe these words, among many others, do not exist. We can, and probably should, have well-founded values, such as those espoused by Dan Dennett, but to encumber these principles with the adjective 'sacred' suggests that they may be beyond discussion and reconsideration.
Do you ever miss the community that church provided?
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 16, 2018:
Having been raised in a very tight-knit faith community, the sense of ‘belonging’ is strong, and seemingly impossible to overcome. We kids did everything together: church, school (run by the church) and all extracurricular activities. It wasn’t until I was a teenager that I made my first friend with a person outside of my faith. And yet I eventually came to the realization that my religion had simply co-opted a natural human need, and that I didn’t need all the hand waving and empty promises to belong. The deepest, most meaningful and emotionally intimate bonds I have formed are with fellow apostates (i.e., those who, like me, once believed but have 'left the church'.) Only those who have walked away from an oppressive cult-like following can fully understand what it is like to be, from the perspective of the believer, a ‘lost soul.’ My advice, if I may, is to find and befriend fellow 'former members.' Of such folk the community of the future is built.
Top 5 Atheist Songs that Christians... [google.com]
p-nullifidian comments on Jul 16, 2018:
Clearly one of the most, if not *the* most played: Imagine, by John Lennon.